The #haze is back!

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The haze has returned to parts of Malaysia

The haze has returned to many parts of Malaysia with the resumption of fires in Sumatra, Air Pollution Index (API) levels are inching higher across parts of the west coast of Peninsular Malaysia with the highest so far recorded in Bandaraya Melaka at 116 according to Malaysia’s Department of Environment. Channel News Asia has reported 261 hotspots in Sumatra with the western Malaysian coast most affected.

By Oliver Ellerton

Ever the bellweather, Twitter is starting to catch fire with the hashtag #haze, with many Twitterers lamenting the return of the smog which caused such consternation last month. The issue was discussed at the 15th Meeting of the Sub-Regional Ministerial Steering Committee (MSC) on Transboundary Haze Pollution in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia last Wednesday, however results of those meetings have largely been kept from the public.

At the end of June, ASEAN foreign ministers urged the Indonesia government to take stronger action surrounding the fires in Sumatra and Indonesian President Bambang Yudhoyono had formally apologised. Fires in Sumatra have long been the cause of haze – the thick blanket of smog that is blown over from Indonesia affecting Singapore and Malaysia.

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Reading Time: 1 minute

The haze has returned to parts of Malaysia

The haze has returned to many parts of Malaysia with the resumption of fires in Sumatra, Air Pollution Index (API) levels are inching higher across parts of the west coast of Peninsular Malaysia with the highest so far recorded in Bandaraya Melaka at 116 according to Malaysia’s Department of Environment. Channel News Asia has reported 261 hotspots in Sumatra with the western Malaysian coast most affected.

Reading Time: 1 minute

The haze has returned to parts of Malaysia

The haze has returned to many parts of Malaysia with the resumption of fires in Sumatra, Air Pollution Index (API) levels are inching higher across parts of the west coast of Peninsular Malaysia with the highest so far recorded in Bandaraya Melaka at 116 according to Malaysia’s Department of Environment. Channel News Asia has reported 261 hotspots in Sumatra with the western Malaysian coast most affected.

By Oliver Ellerton

Ever the bellweather, Twitter is starting to catch fire with the hashtag #haze, with many Twitterers lamenting the return of the smog which caused such consternation last month. The issue was discussed at the 15th Meeting of the Sub-Regional Ministerial Steering Committee (MSC) on Transboundary Haze Pollution in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia last Wednesday, however results of those meetings have largely been kept from the public.

At the end of June, ASEAN foreign ministers urged the Indonesia government to take stronger action surrounding the fires in Sumatra and Indonesian President Bambang Yudhoyono had formally apologised. Fires in Sumatra have long been the cause of haze – the thick blanket of smog that is blown over from Indonesia affecting Singapore and Malaysia.

Do you like this post?
  • Fascinated
  • Happy
  • Sad
  • Angry
  • Bored
  • Afraid