Toshiba, KDDI to equip Myanmar bourse with data center

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Myanmar stockReality is trying to play tough catch up with the madcap economic renewal being undergone in Myanmar, and the Japanese are at the fore of the rush. One of the latest new residents in Yangon, Toshiba Corporation christened their first Myanmar branch office on July 3, announcing its first major project: supplying a modular data center for Myanmar’s proposed Yangon Stock Exchange (YSE), planned to be established by the end of 2015.

Toshiba, along with KDDI Corporation, one of the largest telecom network solution providers in Japan, will take on the project for the securities exchange in Myanmar, the only ASEAN country yet to have a bourse of its own.

The Myanmar deal marks the first time Toshiba will supply its modular data center abroad, and indicates that the Japanese have been successful at grooming business relationships in the emerging Southeast Asian nation, which were assiduously maintained throughout the years of Western-imposed sanctions.

The order to supply the data center was won from Daiwa Institute of Research Ltd, a comprehensive technology think-tank, also from Japan. Indeed, Daiwa was Japan’s first foot in the Myanmar door, making a historically large technological investment in the country. In July 2012, just about the time that Western sanctions first began rolling back, Daiwa was chosen by the Central Bank of Myanmar to spearhead a $380-million IT project to integrate ministries, schools and hospitals through a cloud computing system.

The project gave Japan a credible foundation to springboard off of for greater involvement in Myanmar, with Daiwa being handpicked by the Central Bank of Myanmar to lead the establishment of the YSE.

Now that Toshiba and KDDI Corporation have been selected by their compatriot, the companies will, as Takashi Fukai, a president at Daiwa Institute of Research, told Reuters last year, have to “go into Myanmar in a way that is all-Japan.”

Digitalising Myanmar presents challenges in as far as that the country largely remains lost in the pre-computer age – internet penetration is less than 1 per cent. Moreover, access to stable electricity supplies remain the top concern of both foreign and domestic businesses.

To address such tough conditions, Toshiba will customise the new data center, which will have energy conservation features, as well as redundant integrated systems to allow for continued operation in case one unit fails, Thura Swiss, a Yangon-based consultancy has reported.

“Furthermore, to cater to Myanmar’s irregular electricity supply, there will also be a voltage stabiliser built into the securities exchange modules,” the consultancy said.

This challenge also represents an opportunity for Toshiba. “Toshiba can support providing stable power generation and transmission solutions that provide the backbone for economic growth for Myanmar,” Tetsuya Yoneda, chief representative of the new Toshiba Yangon Branch Office, said on opening day.

It’s the kind of thinking that will keep Myanmar charmed and likely to keep entrusting Japan with integral involvement of the country’s emergent story.

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Reading Time: 2 minutes

Reality is trying to play tough catch up with the madcap economic renewal being undergone in Myanmar, and the Japanese are at the fore of the rush. One of the latest new residents in Yangon, Toshiba Corporation christened their first Myanmar branch office on July 3, announcing its first major project: supplying a modular data center for Myanmar’s proposed Yangon Stock Exchange (YSE), planned to be established by the end of 2015.

Reading Time: 2 minutes

Myanmar stockReality is trying to play tough catch up with the madcap economic renewal being undergone in Myanmar, and the Japanese are at the fore of the rush. One of the latest new residents in Yangon, Toshiba Corporation christened their first Myanmar branch office on July 3, announcing its first major project: supplying a modular data center for Myanmar’s proposed Yangon Stock Exchange (YSE), planned to be established by the end of 2015.

Toshiba, along with KDDI Corporation, one of the largest telecom network solution providers in Japan, will take on the project for the securities exchange in Myanmar, the only ASEAN country yet to have a bourse of its own.

The Myanmar deal marks the first time Toshiba will supply its modular data center abroad, and indicates that the Japanese have been successful at grooming business relationships in the emerging Southeast Asian nation, which were assiduously maintained throughout the years of Western-imposed sanctions.

The order to supply the data center was won from Daiwa Institute of Research Ltd, a comprehensive technology think-tank, also from Japan. Indeed, Daiwa was Japan’s first foot in the Myanmar door, making a historically large technological investment in the country. In July 2012, just about the time that Western sanctions first began rolling back, Daiwa was chosen by the Central Bank of Myanmar to spearhead a $380-million IT project to integrate ministries, schools and hospitals through a cloud computing system.

The project gave Japan a credible foundation to springboard off of for greater involvement in Myanmar, with Daiwa being handpicked by the Central Bank of Myanmar to lead the establishment of the YSE.

Now that Toshiba and KDDI Corporation have been selected by their compatriot, the companies will, as Takashi Fukai, a president at Daiwa Institute of Research, told Reuters last year, have to “go into Myanmar in a way that is all-Japan.”

Digitalising Myanmar presents challenges in as far as that the country largely remains lost in the pre-computer age – internet penetration is less than 1 per cent. Moreover, access to stable electricity supplies remain the top concern of both foreign and domestic businesses.

To address such tough conditions, Toshiba will customise the new data center, which will have energy conservation features, as well as redundant integrated systems to allow for continued operation in case one unit fails, Thura Swiss, a Yangon-based consultancy has reported.

“Furthermore, to cater to Myanmar’s irregular electricity supply, there will also be a voltage stabiliser built into the securities exchange modules,” the consultancy said.

This challenge also represents an opportunity for Toshiba. “Toshiba can support providing stable power generation and transmission solutions that provide the backbone for economic growth for Myanmar,” Tetsuya Yoneda, chief representative of the new Toshiba Yangon Branch Office, said on opening day.

It’s the kind of thinking that will keep Myanmar charmed and likely to keep entrusting Japan with integral involvement of the country’s emergent story.

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