Trump tells Prayuth that Thailand should buy more from US

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Thailand’s trade surplus with the US was one of the key issues discussed during Thai Prime Minister Prayuth Chan-ocha’s meeting with US President Donald Trump in the White House in Washington, D.C. on October 2, an event overshadowed by the fallout of the hurricane disaster in Puerto Rico and a terrifying mass shooting in Las Vegas the night before.

Trump, committed to reduce US trade deficits with a number of countries, also took this stance towards Thailand and told Prayuth that Thailand was “a great country to trade with” and that he thinks “we’re going to try to sell a little bit more to you, if that’s possible.”

He went on talking in his typical stream-of-conciousness rhetoric:

“I do want to say that our relationship on trade – and we’ve been negotiating very long and hard, and we’re meeting with our representatives in a little while to go further. But our relationship on trade is becoming more and more important. And it [Thailand]’s a great country to trade with; they make products and different things that are really very important to us, and we likewise sell to you.”

The U.S. Trade Representative’s office reported that the US trade deficit with Thailand was $18.9 billion last year, the 11th-largest faced by the US, according to Reuters.

Leading Thai exports to the US include machinery, rubber, prepared meat, shrimp and tuna, jewelry and a number of agricultural products, including rubber, while Thailand imports machinery as well, aircraft, gold, optical and medical goods and agricultural products not cultivated in Thailand.

For Thailand, the export volume to the US remains important. The North American country is Thailand’s third-largest bilateral trading partner after Japan and China. US investment in Thailand, concentrated in the petroleum and chemicals, finance, consumer products and automobile production sectors, are substantial, while the country also maintains one if its largest diplomatic missions in the region in the center of Bangkok.

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Thailand's trade surplus with the US was one of the key issues discussed during Thai Prime Minister Prayuth Chan-ocha's meeting with US President Donald Trump in the White House in Washington, D.C. on October 2, an event overshadowed by the fallout of the hurricane disaster in Puerto Rico and a terrifying mass shooting in Las Vegas the night before. Trump, committed to reduce US trade deficits with a number of countries, also took this stance towards Thailand and told Prayuth that Thailand was “a great country to trade with” and that he thinks “we’re going to try to sell a...

Reading Time: 2 minutes

Thailand’s trade surplus with the US was one of the key issues discussed during Thai Prime Minister Prayuth Chan-ocha’s meeting with US President Donald Trump in the White House in Washington, D.C. on October 2, an event overshadowed by the fallout of the hurricane disaster in Puerto Rico and a terrifying mass shooting in Las Vegas the night before.

Trump, committed to reduce US trade deficits with a number of countries, also took this stance towards Thailand and told Prayuth that Thailand was “a great country to trade with” and that he thinks “we’re going to try to sell a little bit more to you, if that’s possible.”

He went on talking in his typical stream-of-conciousness rhetoric:

“I do want to say that our relationship on trade – and we’ve been negotiating very long and hard, and we’re meeting with our representatives in a little while to go further. But our relationship on trade is becoming more and more important. And it [Thailand]’s a great country to trade with; they make products and different things that are really very important to us, and we likewise sell to you.”

The U.S. Trade Representative’s office reported that the US trade deficit with Thailand was $18.9 billion last year, the 11th-largest faced by the US, according to Reuters.

Leading Thai exports to the US include machinery, rubber, prepared meat, shrimp and tuna, jewelry and a number of agricultural products, including rubber, while Thailand imports machinery as well, aircraft, gold, optical and medical goods and agricultural products not cultivated in Thailand.

For Thailand, the export volume to the US remains important. The North American country is Thailand’s third-largest bilateral trading partner after Japan and China. US investment in Thailand, concentrated in the petroleum and chemicals, finance, consumer products and automobile production sectors, are substantial, while the country also maintains one if its largest diplomatic missions in the region in the center of Bangkok.

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