UN: Job creation scheme to rebuild Philippine economy

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typhoon-haiyanThe United Nations has launched a $20 million cash-for-work programme in the Philippines to help ‘resuscitate’ the local economy following the devastation caused by typhoon Haiyan, Public Finance International reported.

It is intended to rehabilitate local businesses and restore community infrastructure such as access roads and town halls. The UN said the programme would also help kick-start public service provision by local government.

Over the next six months, the UN Development Programme project will eventually employ 200,000 local people to help clear up rubble from Haiyan. The typhoon, which struck earlier this month, killed over 5,230 people and affected over 13 million others.

Haoliang Xu, UNDP’s regional director for Asia and the Pacific said during a visit to Tacloban on November 25 that the removal of debris was an important part of the relief operation as streets without rubble were a ‘precondition’ for aid distribution and also reduced the risk of disease.

“In addition to contributing to the humanitarian effort, the debris removal is also a critical component of economic recovery,” he said.

“We’re going to create 200,000 temporary jobs in debris removal in the most affected municipalities over the next six months.”

Over the weekend, the first batch of 180 men and women started to remove rubble and medical waste in two hospitals, two schools and streets in three severely damaged neighbourhoods in Tacloban, one of the worst-hit cities, and in Palo. Both cities will receive basic equipment and tools such as generators, shovels, and wheelbarrows to begin the early recovery process.

But the UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs pointed out that life-saving assistance was still urgently required, particularly food, water and shelter. Affected communities have access to small food stocks, but were increasingly concerned about the lack of food in the long term, with limited or no access to markets, it warned.

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Reading Time: 2 minutes

The United Nations has launched a $20 million cash-for-work programme in the Philippines to help ‘resuscitate’ the local economy following the devastation caused by typhoon Haiyan, Public Finance International reported.

Reading Time: 2 minutes

typhoon-haiyanThe United Nations has launched a $20 million cash-for-work programme in the Philippines to help ‘resuscitate’ the local economy following the devastation caused by typhoon Haiyan, Public Finance International reported.

It is intended to rehabilitate local businesses and restore community infrastructure such as access roads and town halls. The UN said the programme would also help kick-start public service provision by local government.

Over the next six months, the UN Development Programme project will eventually employ 200,000 local people to help clear up rubble from Haiyan. The typhoon, which struck earlier this month, killed over 5,230 people and affected over 13 million others.

Haoliang Xu, UNDP’s regional director for Asia and the Pacific said during a visit to Tacloban on November 25 that the removal of debris was an important part of the relief operation as streets without rubble were a ‘precondition’ for aid distribution and also reduced the risk of disease.

“In addition to contributing to the humanitarian effort, the debris removal is also a critical component of economic recovery,” he said.

“We’re going to create 200,000 temporary jobs in debris removal in the most affected municipalities over the next six months.”

Over the weekend, the first batch of 180 men and women started to remove rubble and medical waste in two hospitals, two schools and streets in three severely damaged neighbourhoods in Tacloban, one of the worst-hit cities, and in Palo. Both cities will receive basic equipment and tools such as generators, shovels, and wheelbarrows to begin the early recovery process.

But the UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs pointed out that life-saving assistance was still urgently required, particularly food, water and shelter. Affected communities have access to small food stocks, but were increasingly concerned about the lack of food in the long term, with limited or no access to markets, it warned.

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