US decries Philippine trade barriers

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MICT-BerthThe US has released a sharply critical report concerning the Philippines’ trade barriers, as well as pervasive corruption and a judiciary system that favours domestic business.

The 2013 report by the United States Trade Representative (USTR) expressed concerns that the Philippines has stalled with completing pest risk analyses for US-grown vegetables, continuing to stymie US farmers from exporting their crops to the Southeast Asian nation.

According to the USTR report, seven years have passed since the US trade agency requested the Philippines to perform pest risk analyses for US-grown broccoli, cauliflower, lettuce, carrots, cabbage, and celery, and four years since a similar request for US fresh potatoes.

In response, the Philippine Department of Agriculture (DA) says it had provided its results for the tests to the US in May 2011, but the process is yet to be completed.

The USTR report was released during a continued bid by Washington to get the Philippines to drop its trade barriers.

The report also follows recent visits made by Sultan Hassanal Bolkiah of Brunei and Prime Minister Lee Xsien Loong of Singapore to Washington, where both leaders separately met with US President Barack Obama to discuss the Trans Pacific Partnership, a strategic free trade zone envisioned to include several nations in ASEAN, and others in north Asian countries and South America.

Additionally, the USTR reported pointed to what it called a long-standing problem of corruption in the Philippines as “one that can place US companies at a disadvantage in the Philippine market.”

The study also concluded that both foreign and domestic investors are put at a disadvantage by Philippine courts and regulations, who tend “to stray beyond matters of legal interpretation into policymaking.”

Transparency in the judiciary system is worrisome to investors, the report stated, and many perceive that Philippine courts are venal and wield their powers to the benefit of entrenched business interests.

 

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The US has released a sharply critical report concerning the Philippines’ trade barriers, as well as pervasive corruption and a judiciary system that favours domestic business. The 2013 report by the United States Trade Representative (USTR) expressed concerns that the Philippines has stalled with completing pest risk analyses for US-grown vegetables, continuing to stymie US farmers from exporting their crops to the Southeast Asian nation. According to the USTR report, seven years have passed since the US trade agency requested the Philippines to perform pest risk analyses for US-grown broccoli, cauliflower, lettuce, carrots, cabbage, and celery, and four years since...

Reading Time: 2 minutes

MICT-BerthThe US has released a sharply critical report concerning the Philippines’ trade barriers, as well as pervasive corruption and a judiciary system that favours domestic business.

The 2013 report by the United States Trade Representative (USTR) expressed concerns that the Philippines has stalled with completing pest risk analyses for US-grown vegetables, continuing to stymie US farmers from exporting their crops to the Southeast Asian nation.

According to the USTR report, seven years have passed since the US trade agency requested the Philippines to perform pest risk analyses for US-grown broccoli, cauliflower, lettuce, carrots, cabbage, and celery, and four years since a similar request for US fresh potatoes.

In response, the Philippine Department of Agriculture (DA) says it had provided its results for the tests to the US in May 2011, but the process is yet to be completed.

The USTR report was released during a continued bid by Washington to get the Philippines to drop its trade barriers.

The report also follows recent visits made by Sultan Hassanal Bolkiah of Brunei and Prime Minister Lee Xsien Loong of Singapore to Washington, where both leaders separately met with US President Barack Obama to discuss the Trans Pacific Partnership, a strategic free trade zone envisioned to include several nations in ASEAN, and others in north Asian countries and South America.

Additionally, the USTR reported pointed to what it called a long-standing problem of corruption in the Philippines as “one that can place US companies at a disadvantage in the Philippine market.”

The study also concluded that both foreign and domestic investors are put at a disadvantage by Philippine courts and regulations, who tend “to stray beyond matters of legal interpretation into policymaking.”

Transparency in the judiciary system is worrisome to investors, the report stated, and many perceive that Philippine courts are venal and wield their powers to the benefit of entrenched business interests.

 

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1 COMMENT

  1. If the Philippines wants to reach the $50-100 billion FDI inflow level of Singapore that is necessary to stimulate our economy with more job opportunities at home, the Aquino Administration should do this first through a constitutional amendment:

    Abolish the 60/40 equity restrictions (Article XII, Sections 2, 10-11; Article XIV, Section 4; Article XVI, Section 11) from the 1987 constitution against foreign individuals or corporations who wishes to set-up their businesses anywhere in our country and allow them to invest 100% from their own capital and own it what they invested in order to lure more foreign investors to invest and stay in our country that will provide jobs to millions of unemployed Filipinos at home as much as possible without constitutional barriers.

    Foreign equity ownership by economic sector should be like this:

    Mining – 100%.
    Oil and gas – 100%.
    Agriculture – 100%.
    Forestry – 100%.
    Light manufacturing – 100%.
    Food products manufacturing – 100%.
    Pharmaceutical manufacturing – 100%.
    Publishing – 100%.
    Fixed-line infrastructure – 100%.
    Fixed-line telephony services – 100%.
    Wireless/mobile infrastructure – 100%.
    Wireless/mobile services – 100%.
    Power distribution – 100%.
    Power generation (biomass) – 100%.
    Power generation (coal) – 100%.
    Power generation (hydro) – 100%.
    Power generation (nuclear) – 100%.
    Power generation (solar) – 100%.
    Power generation (wind) – 100%.
    Power transmission – 100%.
    Banking – 100%.
    Insurance – 100%.
    Airport operation – 100%.
    Domestic air – 100%.
    International air – 100%.
    Domestic shipping – 100%.
    International shipping – 100%.
    Advertising – 100%.
    Magazine – 100%.
    Newspaper – 100%.
    Radio broadcasting – 100%.
    Television broadcasting – 100%.
    Construction – 100%.
    Retail distribution services – 100%.
    Tourism – 100%.
    Education – 100%.
    Health care – 100%.
    Waste management – 100%.

    To those who say that if we will allow foreigners to own 100% of a businesses they invested or owning a piece of land, we will become foreigners in our own land is just a fear mongering tactics by coward and freeloading leftists and ultra nationalists elements of our country.

    By using their appeal to fear, Hong Kong, Japan, Singapore, South Korea, and Taiwan should have been controlled economically and politically by the United States and the European Union but instead, their respective economies caught up the US or EU GDP per capita within a generation and therefore they became a developed economy status.

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