Vietnam demands Monsanto pay its dues for Agent Orange

Reading Time: 2 minutes

Vietnam has demanded US chemical giant Monsanto pay compensation to the victims of Agent Orange, which the company supplied to the US military during the Vietnam War. It came in response to the firm being ordered by a US court to pay $289 million to a school groundsman who claims his use of a Monsanto-produced weed killer contributed to his terminal cancer.

“This case is a precedent that dismisses previous arguments that the herbicides supplied to the US military by Monsanto and other US chemical companies during the Vietnam War are not harmful to people’s health,” said Vietnam’s foreign ministry spokesperson Nguyen Phuong Tra.

“We believe Monsanto should be held responsible for compensating Vietnamese victims of Agent Orange for the damage caused by the company’s herbicides,” he added.

Monsanto, meanwhile owned by German pharmaceutical company Bayer, was one of many producers of Agent Orange, a defoliant used by US forces to deny their Vietnamese adversaries of ground cover and food, while providing clear fields of fire around defensive positions. Between 1961 and 1971, the US military sprayed around 12 million gallons of the chemical substance on over 30,000 miles of southern Vietnam.

Dioxin, a highly toxic element of Agent Orange, has been linked to major health problems such as birth defects, cancers and other deadly diseases. Millions still suffer to this day, as deformities are passed down to the offspring of exposed victims including Vietnamese and US forces.

Monsanto defended its role and argued: “The US government set the specifications for making Agent Orange and determined when, where and how it was used. Agent Orange was only produced for, and used by, the government.”

Monsanto’s acquisition by Bayer could be seen as a merger of companies that were both war chemical producers in the past. Bayer is the successor of Germany’s IG Farben, the world’s largest chemical and pharmaceutical company from 1925 to 1952, which is known for having produced Zyklon B, a cyanide-based pesticide which was used to murder approximately one million people in gas chambers installed at Nazi German’s extermination camps during World War II.

Do you like this post?
  • Fascinated
  • Happy
  • Sad
  • Angry
  • Bored
  • Afraid

Reading Time: 2 minutes

Vietnam has demanded US chemical giant Monsanto pay compensation to the victims of Agent Orange, which the company supplied to the US military during the Vietnam War. It came in response to the firm being ordered by a US court to pay $289 million to a school groundsman who claims his use of a Monsanto-produced weed killer contributed to his terminal cancer.

Reading Time: 2 minutes

Vietnam has demanded US chemical giant Monsanto pay compensation to the victims of Agent Orange, which the company supplied to the US military during the Vietnam War. It came in response to the firm being ordered by a US court to pay $289 million to a school groundsman who claims his use of a Monsanto-produced weed killer contributed to his terminal cancer.

“This case is a precedent that dismisses previous arguments that the herbicides supplied to the US military by Monsanto and other US chemical companies during the Vietnam War are not harmful to people’s health,” said Vietnam’s foreign ministry spokesperson Nguyen Phuong Tra.

“We believe Monsanto should be held responsible for compensating Vietnamese victims of Agent Orange for the damage caused by the company’s herbicides,” he added.

Monsanto, meanwhile owned by German pharmaceutical company Bayer, was one of many producers of Agent Orange, a defoliant used by US forces to deny their Vietnamese adversaries of ground cover and food, while providing clear fields of fire around defensive positions. Between 1961 and 1971, the US military sprayed around 12 million gallons of the chemical substance on over 30,000 miles of southern Vietnam.

Dioxin, a highly toxic element of Agent Orange, has been linked to major health problems such as birth defects, cancers and other deadly diseases. Millions still suffer to this day, as deformities are passed down to the offspring of exposed victims including Vietnamese and US forces.

Monsanto defended its role and argued: “The US government set the specifications for making Agent Orange and determined when, where and how it was used. Agent Orange was only produced for, and used by, the government.”

Monsanto’s acquisition by Bayer could be seen as a merger of companies that were both war chemical producers in the past. Bayer is the successor of Germany’s IG Farben, the world’s largest chemical and pharmaceutical company from 1925 to 1952, which is known for having produced Zyklon B, a cyanide-based pesticide which was used to murder approximately one million people in gas chambers installed at Nazi German’s extermination camps during World War II.

Do you like this post?
  • Fascinated
  • Happy
  • Sad
  • Angry
  • Bored
  • Afraid