War’s over, Marawi to be rebuilt for close to $100 million

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The Philippine government on October 27 kicked off the full reconstruction and rebuilding of conflict-torn Marawi City on the southern island of Mindanao, the town in the center of a brutal conflict with ISIS-related terrorists which now has been deliberated.

Marawi, in the Philippines longest urban ear so far that lasted nearly five months, has been completely destroyed, according to the local government which described the present status of the city as “totally devastated,” especially in the commercial district where the main battle between troops and terrorists was fought. Infrastructure is lying in shatters and the vast majority of buildings is uninhabitable.

An initial five billion pesos (around $96.5 million) have been earmarked for the early recovery phase, Philippine Armed Forces spokesman Restituto Padilla said at a press conference n Manila.

“We are now entering into… our long road to normalcy of the city,” he noted.

He said of the amount, an estimated 3.4 billion pesos will be spent on health and social services and the rest for other urgent help and that the government will disperse another ten billion pesos in 2018 and five billion pesos in 2019. According to other sources, the Marawi administration is also seeking to issue Islamic bonds to Muslim investors to raise funds for recovery.

Clearing the city of remaining unexploded ordnance, improvised explosive devices, and booby traps, post-conflict assessment, clean-up, including location and collection of bodies, are being undertaken, he said.

Basic facilities and services, like water and power, are also in the process of being restored, as a few thousands of internally displaced persons whose houses were destroyed have started returning home. Since the war broke out in May this year, more than 400,000 residents and business proprietors have fled Marawi and are now gradually returning.

The war left 962 Islamist militants, 165 state troops and 47 civilians dead.

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Reading Time: 1 minute

The Philippine government on October 27 kicked off the full reconstruction and rebuilding of conflict-torn Marawi City on the southern island of Mindanao, the town in the center of a brutal conflict with ISIS-related terrorists which now has been deliberated.

Reading Time: 1 minute

The Philippine government on October 27 kicked off the full reconstruction and rebuilding of conflict-torn Marawi City on the southern island of Mindanao, the town in the center of a brutal conflict with ISIS-related terrorists which now has been deliberated.

Marawi, in the Philippines longest urban ear so far that lasted nearly five months, has been completely destroyed, according to the local government which described the present status of the city as “totally devastated,” especially in the commercial district where the main battle between troops and terrorists was fought. Infrastructure is lying in shatters and the vast majority of buildings is uninhabitable.

An initial five billion pesos (around $96.5 million) have been earmarked for the early recovery phase, Philippine Armed Forces spokesman Restituto Padilla said at a press conference n Manila.

“We are now entering into… our long road to normalcy of the city,” he noted.

He said of the amount, an estimated 3.4 billion pesos will be spent on health and social services and the rest for other urgent help and that the government will disperse another ten billion pesos in 2018 and five billion pesos in 2019. According to other sources, the Marawi administration is also seeking to issue Islamic bonds to Muslim investors to raise funds for recovery.

Clearing the city of remaining unexploded ordnance, improvised explosive devices, and booby traps, post-conflict assessment, clean-up, including location and collection of bodies, are being undertaken, he said.

Basic facilities and services, like water and power, are also in the process of being restored, as a few thousands of internally displaced persons whose houses were destroyed have started returning home. Since the war broke out in May this year, more than 400,000 residents and business proprietors have fled Marawi and are now gradually returning.

The war left 962 Islamist militants, 165 state troops and 47 civilians dead.

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