What a Thai ‘people’s government’ would want

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Suthep Thaugsuban
Anti-government protest leader Suthep Thaugsuban (center)

It is getting clearer what could follow the massive street protest in Bangkok if they are eventually successful in toppling the current government. Protest leader Suthep Thaugsuban, who on November 27 called for a nationwide uprising after protesters in Bangkok seized at least six ministries including the Finance Ministry’s Budget Bureau, held a speech outlining his six-point plan for the reform of the country once the “Thaksin regime” would have been eliminated.

Point 1: An electoral system free from vote buying

Point 2: Effective measures to end corruption

Point 3: People should have the power to remove politicians and administrative power should be decentralised by electing provincial governors

Point 4: A police reform, so that the police force would “truly belong to the people” and perform their duties under the command of the elected governor of their respective province

Point 5: A bureaucracy reform

Point 6: Solving the problems inherent in education, social affairs, public health and transport, an economic system free of monopoly. Investment in transport infrastructure as answer to the country’s needs, not to politicians’.

Suthep has rejected new elections, which the now-opposition Democrats are certain to lose.

“If we take down the Thaksin regime tomorrow, we will set up a people’s council the day after tomorrow,” he said. “Let the people’s council pick a good man to be the prime minister, good men to be ministers. Make it a dream team, make a cabinet of your dream and the people’s government.”

However, forming of a people’s government is not allowed by the constitution, a government speaker said, rejecting Suthep’s plan. Prime Minister Yingluck Shinawatra said that setting up such an administration “would require laws to back it up”. This would need the government’s cooperation.

 

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Reading Time: 1 minute

Anti-government protest leader Suthep Thaugsuban (center)

It is getting clearer what could follow the massive street protest in Bangkok if they are eventually successful in toppling the current government. Protest leader Suthep Thaugsuban, who on November 27 called for a nationwide uprising after protesters in Bangkok seized at least six ministries including the Finance Ministry’s Budget Bureau, held a speech outlining his six-point plan for the reform of the country once the “Thaksin regime” would have been eliminated.

Reading Time: 1 minute

Suthep Thaugsuban
Anti-government protest leader Suthep Thaugsuban (center)

It is getting clearer what could follow the massive street protest in Bangkok if they are eventually successful in toppling the current government. Protest leader Suthep Thaugsuban, who on November 27 called for a nationwide uprising after protesters in Bangkok seized at least six ministries including the Finance Ministry’s Budget Bureau, held a speech outlining his six-point plan for the reform of the country once the “Thaksin regime” would have been eliminated.

Point 1: An electoral system free from vote buying

Point 2: Effective measures to end corruption

Point 3: People should have the power to remove politicians and administrative power should be decentralised by electing provincial governors

Point 4: A police reform, so that the police force would “truly belong to the people” and perform their duties under the command of the elected governor of their respective province

Point 5: A bureaucracy reform

Point 6: Solving the problems inherent in education, social affairs, public health and transport, an economic system free of monopoly. Investment in transport infrastructure as answer to the country’s needs, not to politicians’.

Suthep has rejected new elections, which the now-opposition Democrats are certain to lose.

“If we take down the Thaksin regime tomorrow, we will set up a people’s council the day after tomorrow,” he said. “Let the people’s council pick a good man to be the prime minister, good men to be ministers. Make it a dream team, make a cabinet of your dream and the people’s government.”

However, forming of a people’s government is not allowed by the constitution, a government speaker said, rejecting Suthep’s plan. Prime Minister Yingluck Shinawatra said that setting up such an administration “would require laws to back it up”. This would need the government’s cooperation.

 

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