Women key to Malaysian productivity

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If Malaysia can close their gender gap, economic momentum substantial enough to escape the middle-income trap would be feasible, the World Bank’s 2012 report on the country has assessed.

Countries at a comparable economic stage to Malaysia employ a higher number of women, suggesting that if the majority Muslim nation empowers women, high-income status would be achievable. A recent study has shown that the country could have an increase of 23 per cent output per capita if women play a larger role in the workforce and are encouraged to participate in entrepreneurial jobs.

In order to increase women participation in the labour market, Malaysia would have to implement policies such as “flexi-work arrangements, expanded childcare options, targeted subsidized childcare options for poor families, and increasing incentives that would attract and retain women in managerial positions,” the World Bank mentioned in the report.

Malaysia has given healthy signals that working towards the current government’s goal of achieving high-income status by 2020 may not be an outrageous pipe dream.

Malaysia has agilely deflected negative effects from the global economic downturn largely in part due to strong growth in domestic demand, a trait that has also buoyed other emerging economies in the region, such as the Philippines, Thailand and Indonesia.

Real GDP growth in Malaysia is expected to reach 5.1 per cent in 2012 and 5 per cent in 2013, according to World Bank statistics.

Malaysia’s most alluring sectors for investment continue to be in oil and gas, and real estate, which is linked to the recycling of revenue from commodities, a large contributor to the country’s sustained growth.

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If Malaysia can close their gender gap, economic momentum substantial enough to escape the middle-income trap would be feasible, the World Bank’s 2012 report on the country has assessed. Countries at a comparable economic stage to Malaysia employ a higher number of women, suggesting that if the majority Muslim nation empowers women, high-income status would be achievable. A recent study has shown that the country could have an increase of 23 per cent output per capita if women play a larger role in the workforce and are encouraged to participate in entrepreneurial jobs. In order to increase women participation in...

Reading Time: 1 minute

If Malaysia can close their gender gap, economic momentum substantial enough to escape the middle-income trap would be feasible, the World Bank’s 2012 report on the country has assessed.

Countries at a comparable economic stage to Malaysia employ a higher number of women, suggesting that if the majority Muslim nation empowers women, high-income status would be achievable. A recent study has shown that the country could have an increase of 23 per cent output per capita if women play a larger role in the workforce and are encouraged to participate in entrepreneurial jobs.

In order to increase women participation in the labour market, Malaysia would have to implement policies such as “flexi-work arrangements, expanded childcare options, targeted subsidized childcare options for poor families, and increasing incentives that would attract and retain women in managerial positions,” the World Bank mentioned in the report.

Malaysia has given healthy signals that working towards the current government’s goal of achieving high-income status by 2020 may not be an outrageous pipe dream.

Malaysia has agilely deflected negative effects from the global economic downturn largely in part due to strong growth in domestic demand, a trait that has also buoyed other emerging economies in the region, such as the Philippines, Thailand and Indonesia.

Real GDP growth in Malaysia is expected to reach 5.1 per cent in 2012 and 5 per cent in 2013, according to World Bank statistics.

Malaysia’s most alluring sectors for investment continue to be in oil and gas, and real estate, which is linked to the recycling of revenue from commodities, a large contributor to the country’s sustained growth.

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2 COMMENTS

  1. From the work we have carried out in Malaysia and out of the thousands of meetings we have conducted here women do play an important role in middle management but there is not enough women in senior management. Those that are there such as the CEO of KPJ Healthcare, CEO of Hong Leong Islamic Bank, CEO/MD of Affin Islamic Bank and the Governor of the Central Bank are extremely well respected figures in the business community. More should be done to encourage them to play a bigger role and to be role models for younger graduates as well as providing the benefits that you would get in Nordic countries.

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