World Toilet Summit held in Indonesia

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golden toiletLack of public toilets and open defecation were among issues highlighted at the 13th World Toilet Summit that opened for the first time in Indonesia on October 2. As many as 386 participants from 19 countries are attending the summit.

The summit focuses on the problem that worldwide, 2.5 billion people have no access to toilets and sewage systems. One million children die each year from diarrhoea, according the United Nations.

In Indonesia, 63 million people practice open defecation because they have no access to basic sanitation facilities, said Naning Adiwoso, chairwoman of the Indonesian Toilet Association.

“For many people in Indonesia, mobile phones are more important than toilets,” Adiwoso said. “People defecate in the backyards and think that nature will take its course. There’s a widespread lack of awareness about the importance of sanitation.”

At the three-day summit in the Central Java city of Solo, speakers will talk about how to clean, repair and maintain toilets as well as the designs of public restrooms.

Adiwoso said in Jakarta some households do not have toilets and public restrooms are hard to find.

“There are hardly any toilet maps in Jakarta and the few public toilets are in terrible condition,” she said.

Jack Sim, a Singaporean who founded the World Toilet Organisation in 2001, said the theme for the summit this year is “toilets and tourism.”

“Without good toilets, tourism can’t thrive,” he said. “Toilets are part of the holiday experience.”

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Reading Time: 1 minute

Lack of public toilets and open defecation were among issues highlighted at the 13th World Toilet Summit that opened for the first time in Indonesia on October 2. As many as 386 participants from 19 countries are attending the summit.

Reading Time: 1 minute

golden toiletLack of public toilets and open defecation were among issues highlighted at the 13th World Toilet Summit that opened for the first time in Indonesia on October 2. As many as 386 participants from 19 countries are attending the summit.

The summit focuses on the problem that worldwide, 2.5 billion people have no access to toilets and sewage systems. One million children die each year from diarrhoea, according the United Nations.

In Indonesia, 63 million people practice open defecation because they have no access to basic sanitation facilities, said Naning Adiwoso, chairwoman of the Indonesian Toilet Association.

“For many people in Indonesia, mobile phones are more important than toilets,” Adiwoso said. “People defecate in the backyards and think that nature will take its course. There’s a widespread lack of awareness about the importance of sanitation.”

At the three-day summit in the Central Java city of Solo, speakers will talk about how to clean, repair and maintain toilets as well as the designs of public restrooms.

Adiwoso said in Jakarta some households do not have toilets and public restrooms are hard to find.

“There are hardly any toilet maps in Jakarta and the few public toilets are in terrible condition,” she said.

Jack Sim, a Singaporean who founded the World Toilet Organisation in 2001, said the theme for the summit this year is “toilets and tourism.”

“Without good toilets, tourism can’t thrive,” he said. “Toilets are part of the holiday experience.”

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