ASEAN’s growing population: Many new mouths to feed

kidsASEAN’s overall population is exploding. Whether this is good or bad is dependent on the country. While large populations can be viewed as adding a productive element to a nation, they can also be destabilising to others.

Composed of among the fastest growing economies in the world, ASEAN’s new mouths to feed will increasingly gather the wherewithal to purchase more expensive and environmentally taxing food, such as beef, as well as consume greater amounts of water.

However, more able, educated bodies make an economy more competitive, especially in the manufacturing sector, as the past decade has seen with China. In Malaysia’s largest state of Sarawak, for example, which only has over 2.4 million people, greater population growth would benefit the state as it currently suffers from an economic loss due to the import of labour.

Investvine took a look at the projected population growth for the 10 ASEAN countries, discovering that the Philippines – a Catholic country that struggles with implementing safe parenting laws – is the fasting growing, with a population growth multiplier of 1.6, making the projected 2050 population over 154 million by 2050. Meanwhile, Indonesia will continue to expand at a clip close to the Philippines, hitting a whopping population of 309 million by 2050.

These two nations, as the infograph below shows, are in direct contract to slowly growing countries such as Thailand, which is projected to curb its population from increasing hardly at all over the next few decades.

Should quickly burgeoning populations be viewed as a blessing or curse?

Adobe Photoshop PDF

Infographic: Manuel Edralin



Support ASEAN news

Investvine has been a consistent voice in ASEAN news for more than a decade. From breaking news to exclusive interviews with key ASEAN leaders, we have brought you factual and engaging reports – the stories that matter, free of charge.

Like many news organisations, we are striving to survive in an age of reduced advertising and biased journalism. Our mission is to rise above today’s challenges and chart tomorrow’s world with clear, dependable reporting.

Support us now with a donation of your choosing. Your contribution will help us shine a light on important ASEAN stories, reach more people and lift the manifold voices of this dynamic, influential region.

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Personal Info

Donation Total: $10.00

 

 

ASEAN's overall population is exploding. Whether this is good or bad is dependent on the country. While large populations can be viewed as adding a productive element to a nation, they can also be destabilising to others. Composed of among the fastest growing economies in the world, ASEAN's new mouths to feed will increasingly gather the wherewithal to purchase more expensive and environmentally taxing food, such as beef, as well as consume greater amounts of water. However, more able, educated bodies make an economy more competitive, especially in the manufacturing sector, as the past decade has seen with China. In Malaysia's...

kidsASEAN’s overall population is exploding. Whether this is good or bad is dependent on the country. While large populations can be viewed as adding a productive element to a nation, they can also be destabilising to others.

Composed of among the fastest growing economies in the world, ASEAN’s new mouths to feed will increasingly gather the wherewithal to purchase more expensive and environmentally taxing food, such as beef, as well as consume greater amounts of water.

However, more able, educated bodies make an economy more competitive, especially in the manufacturing sector, as the past decade has seen with China. In Malaysia’s largest state of Sarawak, for example, which only has over 2.4 million people, greater population growth would benefit the state as it currently suffers from an economic loss due to the import of labour.

Investvine took a look at the projected population growth for the 10 ASEAN countries, discovering that the Philippines – a Catholic country that struggles with implementing safe parenting laws – is the fasting growing, with a population growth multiplier of 1.6, making the projected 2050 population over 154 million by 2050. Meanwhile, Indonesia will continue to expand at a clip close to the Philippines, hitting a whopping population of 309 million by 2050.

These two nations, as the infograph below shows, are in direct contract to slowly growing countries such as Thailand, which is projected to curb its population from increasing hardly at all over the next few decades.

Should quickly burgeoning populations be viewed as a blessing or curse?

Adobe Photoshop PDF

Infographic: Manuel Edralin



Support ASEAN news

Investvine has been a consistent voice in ASEAN news for more than a decade. From breaking news to exclusive interviews with key ASEAN leaders, we have brought you factual and engaging reports – the stories that matter, free of charge.

Like many news organisations, we are striving to survive in an age of reduced advertising and biased journalism. Our mission is to rise above today’s challenges and chart tomorrow’s world with clear, dependable reporting.

Support us now with a donation of your choosing. Your contribution will help us shine a light on important ASEAN stories, reach more people and lift the manifold voices of this dynamic, influential region.

$
Personal Info

Donation Total: $10.00

 

 

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