Indonesia to spend nearly $280 million to create “five new Balis”

View at the iconic landscape of Labuan Bajo in East Nusa Tenggara

Indonesia is preparing for a post-Covid-19 tourism boost and seeks to increase the number of locations that would attract tourists beyond Bali and a few other popular destinations.

The government in Jakarta plans to spend around four trillion rupiah ($278.4 million) this year on 108 basic infrastructure projects in five prioritised tourist destinations to spur visits. The number, however, was downgraded from ten destinations in an earlier concept.

According to the country’s public works and housing ministry, the projects comprise roads and transport, clean water supply, waste management, sanitation, residential housing improvements and more.

The destinations, referred to as the “five new Balis”, are Lake Toba in North Sumatra, Borobudur in South Java, Labuan Bajo in East Nusa Tenggara, Mandalika in West Nusa Tenggara and Likupang in North Sulawesi.

The destinations to be developed

Lake Toba is a large lake in North Sumatra that sits in the caldera of a volcano.

Borobudur is the world’s largest Buddhist temple, which dates back to the eighth century. It was restored in the 1970s.

Labuan Bajo is a fishing town known as the gateway to the home of the Komodo dragon.

Mandalika is a resort area that was designated a special economic zone in 2014. It is located on Lombok, an island that neighbours Bali, and is set to be the host of the Grand Prix Motorcycle race later this year.

Likupang is a popular diving and snorkeling site.

Arrivals to Bali dropped over 93 per cent in 2020 as the Covid-19 pandemic hit global air travel

In 2019, Indonesia welcomed 16.1 million foreign tourists, according to data from the country’s central bureau of statistics. Bali alone saw 6.23 million foreign arrivals that year, the most of any destination in the country.

The pandemic, naturally, put tourism to a halt globally, and Indonesia was no exception. In April 2020, foreign arrivals in Bali dropped by more than 93 per cent. In the same month, the government announced the pandemic was forecast to wipe out $10 billion from its tourism revenue by the end of the year. By November, Indonesia announced it was in its first recession in 22 years.

Now, the government is trying to kickstart tourism with a series of proposed measures that include travel bubbles between several of its islands and nearby Singapore, and a five-year visa targeting business travelers and digital nomads.



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View at the iconic landscape of Labuan Bajo in East Nusa Tenggara Indonesia is preparing for a post-Covid-19 tourism boost and seeks to increase the number of locations that would attract tourists beyond Bali and a few other popular destinations. The government in Jakarta plans to spend around four trillion rupiah ($278.4 million) this year on 108 basic infrastructure projects in five prioritised tourist destinations to spur visits. The number, however, was downgraded from ten destinations in an earlier concept. According to the country’s public works and housing ministry, the projects comprise roads and transport, clean water supply, waste management,...

View at the iconic landscape of Labuan Bajo in East Nusa Tenggara

Indonesia is preparing for a post-Covid-19 tourism boost and seeks to increase the number of locations that would attract tourists beyond Bali and a few other popular destinations.

The government in Jakarta plans to spend around four trillion rupiah ($278.4 million) this year on 108 basic infrastructure projects in five prioritised tourist destinations to spur visits. The number, however, was downgraded from ten destinations in an earlier concept.

According to the country’s public works and housing ministry, the projects comprise roads and transport, clean water supply, waste management, sanitation, residential housing improvements and more.

The destinations, referred to as the “five new Balis”, are Lake Toba in North Sumatra, Borobudur in South Java, Labuan Bajo in East Nusa Tenggara, Mandalika in West Nusa Tenggara and Likupang in North Sulawesi.

The destinations to be developed

Lake Toba is a large lake in North Sumatra that sits in the caldera of a volcano.

Borobudur is the world’s largest Buddhist temple, which dates back to the eighth century. It was restored in the 1970s.

Labuan Bajo is a fishing town known as the gateway to the home of the Komodo dragon.

Mandalika is a resort area that was designated a special economic zone in 2014. It is located on Lombok, an island that neighbours Bali, and is set to be the host of the Grand Prix Motorcycle race later this year.

Likupang is a popular diving and snorkeling site.

Arrivals to Bali dropped over 93 per cent in 2020 as the Covid-19 pandemic hit global air travel

In 2019, Indonesia welcomed 16.1 million foreign tourists, according to data from the country’s central bureau of statistics. Bali alone saw 6.23 million foreign arrivals that year, the most of any destination in the country.

The pandemic, naturally, put tourism to a halt globally, and Indonesia was no exception. In April 2020, foreign arrivals in Bali dropped by more than 93 per cent. In the same month, the government announced the pandemic was forecast to wipe out $10 billion from its tourism revenue by the end of the year. By November, Indonesia announced it was in its first recession in 22 years.

Now, the government is trying to kickstart tourism with a series of proposed measures that include travel bubbles between several of its islands and nearby Singapore, and a five-year visa targeting business travelers and digital nomads.



Support ASEAN news

Investvine has been a consistent voice in ASEAN news for more than a decade. From breaking news to exclusive interviews with key ASEAN leaders, we have brought you factual and engaging reports – the stories that matter, free of charge.

Like many news organisations, we are striving to survive in an age of reduced advertising and biased journalism. Our mission is to rise above today’s challenges and chart tomorrow’s world with clear, dependable reporting.

Support us now with a donation of your choosing. Your contribution will help us shine a light on important ASEAN stories, reach more people and lift the manifold voices of this dynamic, influential region.

$
Personal Info

Donation Total: $10.00

 

 

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