Bangkok braces for floods – again

During last year’s floods in Thailand, factories of multinational companies were badly hit

After heavy monsoon rainfall over the last week, Bangkok residents and businesses have become increasingly worried about another catastrophe resembling last year’s flooding that killed over 800 people in Thailand and set parts of the capital under water.

The provinces of Sukothai and Ayutthaya north of Bangkok have already been severely hit by floods. Thousands fled their homes after heavy rain caused a major river, the Yom, a main tributary to the Chao Phraya river, to overflow at the start of the month, sending up to a metre of water into some towns.

So far, four people have died.

Bangkok residents are now worried they could be next. Industrial estates in the nothern parts of town and in the suburbs are busy building flood walls and dredging nearby canals. The Royal Irrigation Department plans to release water through the Chao Phraya river, Bangkok’s main waterway, from the north which could cause the river’s level to rise between 20 and 50 centimeter.

The city’s administration has put all 50 districts of Bangkok on alert for possible flooding as heavy rain is forecast over this weekend.

The Thai government has been critisised for not being able to cope with the annual flood crisis. The floods come amid concerns that the country’s government failed to act fast enough to strengthen flood defence, although $11.2 billion for flood prevention have been set aside. Analysts say the flood management plans are unclear and the government needs to better inform local communities vulnerable to potential floods. Abuse of the funds might have played an additional role that the prevention measures did not suffice yet.

Flood defences at seven key industrial zones were badly hit in 2011, crippling Thailand’s electronics and auto sectors and crushing foreign investor confidence. The costs for the Thai economy amounted to $45 billion.

 



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[caption id="attachment_4537" align="alignleft" width="240"] During last year's floods in Thailand, factories of multinational companies were badly hit[/caption] After heavy monsoon rainfall over the last week, Bangkok residents and businesses have become increasingly worried about another catastrophe resembling last year's flooding that killed over 800 people in Thailand and set parts of the capital under water. The provinces of Sukothai and Ayutthaya north of Bangkok have already been severely hit by floods. Thousands fled their homes after heavy rain caused a major river, the Yom, a main tributary to the Chao Phraya river, to overflow at the start of the month,...

During last year’s floods in Thailand, factories of multinational companies were badly hit

After heavy monsoon rainfall over the last week, Bangkok residents and businesses have become increasingly worried about another catastrophe resembling last year’s flooding that killed over 800 people in Thailand and set parts of the capital under water.

The provinces of Sukothai and Ayutthaya north of Bangkok have already been severely hit by floods. Thousands fled their homes after heavy rain caused a major river, the Yom, a main tributary to the Chao Phraya river, to overflow at the start of the month, sending up to a metre of water into some towns.

So far, four people have died.

Bangkok residents are now worried they could be next. Industrial estates in the nothern parts of town and in the suburbs are busy building flood walls and dredging nearby canals. The Royal Irrigation Department plans to release water through the Chao Phraya river, Bangkok’s main waterway, from the north which could cause the river’s level to rise between 20 and 50 centimeter.

The city’s administration has put all 50 districts of Bangkok on alert for possible flooding as heavy rain is forecast over this weekend.

The Thai government has been critisised for not being able to cope with the annual flood crisis. The floods come amid concerns that the country’s government failed to act fast enough to strengthen flood defence, although $11.2 billion for flood prevention have been set aside. Analysts say the flood management plans are unclear and the government needs to better inform local communities vulnerable to potential floods. Abuse of the funds might have played an additional role that the prevention measures did not suffice yet.

Flood defences at seven key industrial zones were badly hit in 2011, crippling Thailand’s electronics and auto sectors and crushing foreign investor confidence. The costs for the Thai economy amounted to $45 billion.

 



Support ASEAN news

Investvine has been a consistent voice in ASEAN news for more than a decade. From breaking news to exclusive interviews with key ASEAN leaders, we have brought you factual and engaging reports – the stories that matter, free of charge.

Like many news organisations, we are striving to survive in an age of reduced advertising and biased journalism. Our mission is to rise above today’s challenges and chart tomorrow’s world with clear, dependable reporting.

Support us now with a donation of your choosing. Your contribution will help us shine a light on important ASEAN stories, reach more people and lift the manifold voices of this dynamic, influential region.

$
Personal Info

Donation Total: $10.00

 

 

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