Cambodia deploys new army of mine-sniffing rats

Rats can be trained to sniff TNT

Cambodia has deployed its next generation of rat recruits to sniff out landmines left from several armed conflicts in the past as part of efforts to boost de-mining operations in a country plagued for decades by unexploded ordinance (UXO).

The move comes after reports surfaced that one of the country’s most famous land mine-sniffing rats, Magawa, together with a team of “hero rats,” is retiring after five years. This particular rat has been the most successful rodent trained and overseen by a Belgian nonprofit organisation, APOPO, to find land mines and alert his human handlers so the explosives can be safely removed.

Magawa found 71 landmines and 28 UXO during his career, according to APOPO. The animal received a gold medal last year from Britain’s People’s Dispensary for Sick Animals for “lifesaving bravery and devotion to duty.”

Rats are sniffing more than 1,000 square kilometers of remaining contaminated land

Meanwhile, 20 newly imported African giant pouched rats from Tanzania have undergone intense training to find mines in areas of the country spanning over 1,000 square kilometers of land believed to be still contaminated from unexploded objects left from the Vietnam War and other conflicts such as the Cambodian civil war and the Vietnamese invasion in the 1970s that ousted the Khmer Rouge regime.

Alongside Laos, Cambodia has been of the world’s most heavily bombed and landmined countries, It has among the highest number of amputees per capita, with more than 40,000 people losing limbs to explosives.

As for mine sniffing rats, unlike metal detectors, they ignore scrap metal and only sniff out explosives, making them fast and efficient landmine detectors. This not only saves lives but returns much-needed safe land back to the communities as quickly and cost-effectively as possible.



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Rats can be trained to sniff TNT Cambodia has deployed its next generation of rat recruits to sniff out landmines left from several armed conflicts in the past as part of efforts to boost de-mining operations in a country plagued for decades by unexploded ordinance (UXO). The move comes after reports surfaced that one of the country’s most famous land mine-sniffing rats, Magawa, together with a team of "hero rats," is retiring after five years. This particular rat has been the most successful rodent trained and overseen by a Belgian nonprofit organisation, APOPO, to find land mines and alert his...

Rats can be trained to sniff TNT

Cambodia has deployed its next generation of rat recruits to sniff out landmines left from several armed conflicts in the past as part of efforts to boost de-mining operations in a country plagued for decades by unexploded ordinance (UXO).

The move comes after reports surfaced that one of the country’s most famous land mine-sniffing rats, Magawa, together with a team of “hero rats,” is retiring after five years. This particular rat has been the most successful rodent trained and overseen by a Belgian nonprofit organisation, APOPO, to find land mines and alert his human handlers so the explosives can be safely removed.

Magawa found 71 landmines and 28 UXO during his career, according to APOPO. The animal received a gold medal last year from Britain’s People’s Dispensary for Sick Animals for “lifesaving bravery and devotion to duty.”

Rats are sniffing more than 1,000 square kilometers of remaining contaminated land

Meanwhile, 20 newly imported African giant pouched rats from Tanzania have undergone intense training to find mines in areas of the country spanning over 1,000 square kilometers of land believed to be still contaminated from unexploded objects left from the Vietnam War and other conflicts such as the Cambodian civil war and the Vietnamese invasion in the 1970s that ousted the Khmer Rouge regime.

Alongside Laos, Cambodia has been of the world’s most heavily bombed and landmined countries, It has among the highest number of amputees per capita, with more than 40,000 people losing limbs to explosives.

As for mine sniffing rats, unlike metal detectors, they ignore scrap metal and only sniff out explosives, making them fast and efficient landmine detectors. This not only saves lives but returns much-needed safe land back to the communities as quickly and cost-effectively as possible.



Support ASEAN news

Investvine has been a consistent voice in ASEAN news for more than a decade. From breaking news to exclusive interviews with key ASEAN leaders, we have brought you factual and engaging reports – the stories that matter, free of charge.

Like many news organisations, we are striving to survive in an age of reduced advertising and biased journalism. Our mission is to rise above today’s challenges and chart tomorrow’s world with clear, dependable reporting.

Support us now with a donation of your choosing. Your contribution will help us shine a light on important ASEAN stories, reach more people and lift the manifold voices of this dynamic, influential region.

$
Personal Info

Donation Total: $10.00

 

 

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