Chinese firms seek to set up large-scale durian plantations in Laos

Chinese companies have discovered Laos as a location to set up large-scale durian plantations to grow the fruits and sell them on the Chinese market, according to local media reports.

The companies are looking to lease up to 4,800 hectares of state-owned land around the capital Vientiane, which is an unprecedented scale because durian has only been commercially grown in Laos in very small amounts in the past, mainly on the cool and fertile southern plateau.

The Chinese are particularly fond of low land lease and labour costs in Laos, as well as about a free trade agreement which exempts fruits re-imports from tariffs.

There are two varieties of durian being grown in Laos, the native variety and Monthong. They are sold in stalls along the main roads in May every year along with seasonal fruits such as pineapple and jackfruit. The price of local durians is about 30,000 kip ($3.20) each, and a popular way of consuming the fruit among the locals is to eat it with sticky rice.

Planting trials already carried out

In the past years, some Chinese companies have carried out planting trials of durian varieties such as Monthong, Musang King and Black Thorn in a few provinces in Laos, but the trees have not yet born fruit. Musang King, which is very expensive in China, is very delicate and requires close attention in temperature, soil moisture and field management, and there have been a few failed trials in Laos.

Durians from Laos have been approved for export to China in 2020. It will become more convenient to export to China by rail freight in the future with the launch of the China-Laos railway. In addition, a tropical fruit processing and exhibition center in Guangdong Province, China has been already set up.



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Chinese companies have discovered Laos as a location to set up large-scale durian plantations to grow the fruits and sell them on the Chinese market, according to local media reports. The companies are looking to lease up to 4,800 hectares of state-owned land around the capital Vientiane, which is an unprecedented scale because durian has only been commercially grown in Laos in very small amounts in the past, mainly on the cool and fertile southern plateau. The Chinese are particularly fond of low land lease and labour costs in Laos, as well as about a free trade agreement which exempts...

Chinese companies have discovered Laos as a location to set up large-scale durian plantations to grow the fruits and sell them on the Chinese market, according to local media reports.

The companies are looking to lease up to 4,800 hectares of state-owned land around the capital Vientiane, which is an unprecedented scale because durian has only been commercially grown in Laos in very small amounts in the past, mainly on the cool and fertile southern plateau.

The Chinese are particularly fond of low land lease and labour costs in Laos, as well as about a free trade agreement which exempts fruits re-imports from tariffs.

There are two varieties of durian being grown in Laos, the native variety and Monthong. They are sold in stalls along the main roads in May every year along with seasonal fruits such as pineapple and jackfruit. The price of local durians is about 30,000 kip ($3.20) each, and a popular way of consuming the fruit among the locals is to eat it with sticky rice.

Planting trials already carried out

In the past years, some Chinese companies have carried out planting trials of durian varieties such as Monthong, Musang King and Black Thorn in a few provinces in Laos, but the trees have not yet born fruit. Musang King, which is very expensive in China, is very delicate and requires close attention in temperature, soil moisture and field management, and there have been a few failed trials in Laos.

Durians from Laos have been approved for export to China in 2020. It will become more convenient to export to China by rail freight in the future with the launch of the China-Laos railway. In addition, a tropical fruit processing and exhibition center in Guangdong Province, China has been already set up.



Support ASEAN news

Investvine has been a consistent voice in ASEAN news for more than a decade. From breaking news to exclusive interviews with key ASEAN leaders, we have brought you factual and engaging reports – the stories that matter, free of charge.

Like many news organisations, we are striving to survive in an age of reduced advertising and biased journalism. Our mission is to rise above today’s challenges and chart tomorrow’s world with clear, dependable reporting.

Support us now with a donation of your choosing. Your contribution will help us shine a light on important ASEAN stories, reach more people and lift the manifold voices of this dynamic, influential region.

$
Personal Info

Donation Total: $10.00

 

 

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