Filipinos want higher wages, firms refuse

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Phil salariesForeign companies in the Philippines firms have reportedly refused to raise their minimum salary as demanded by trade unions, saying they fear the Philippines might lose its competitive advantage in an “increasingly tough global investment climate.”

In July 2013, the Trade Union Congress of the Philippines (TUCP) reiterated a formal request that the Regional Tripartite Wages and Productivity Board in the National Capital Region raise the daily minimum wage in Metro Manila by 85 pesos ($1.95), arguing that living costs such electricity, water, LNG and school fees have been rising and needed to be shouldered by workers.

“The 85-peso daily increase in NCR is essential if workers are to cope with the increasing cost of living, if they are to meet the basic needs of their families, and if the country is to give meaning and substance to the policy of equitable distribution of income and wealth,” TUCP President Victorino Balais said.

The current minimum wage in the National Capital region is pegged at 349.50 pesos ($8.02) per day and gets eroded by 2.7-3 per cent inflation and high costs of basic needs, the trade unions said. The minimum daily wage in Metro Manila is $10.74.

However, foreign investors said that they will not meet the  demands as they are “not only uncalled for, but they will harm the country’s investment levels and cost the jobs of thousands in the small and medium-sized enterprise sector.”

The Employers Confederation of the Philippines President Edgardo Lacson said that a rise at this time was “unnecessary and has no factual and legal basis”. He also said the workers’ calculations were “flawed”, according to local media reports.

The Department of Labour and Employment suggested that workers would be receiving “non-wage benefits including contractualisation, tax exemption and social protection” instead.



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Foreign companies in the Philippines firms have reportedly refused to raise their minimum salary as demanded by trade unions, saying they fear the Philippines might lose its competitive advantage in an "increasingly tough global investment climate." In July 2013, the Trade Union Congress of the Philippines (TUCP) reiterated a formal request that the Regional Tripartite Wages and Productivity Board in the National Capital Region raise the daily minimum wage in Metro Manila by 85 pesos ($1.95), arguing that living costs such electricity, water, LNG and school fees have been rising and needed to be shouldered by workers. “The 85-peso daily...

Phil salariesForeign companies in the Philippines firms have reportedly refused to raise their minimum salary as demanded by trade unions, saying they fear the Philippines might lose its competitive advantage in an “increasingly tough global investment climate.”

In July 2013, the Trade Union Congress of the Philippines (TUCP) reiterated a formal request that the Regional Tripartite Wages and Productivity Board in the National Capital Region raise the daily minimum wage in Metro Manila by 85 pesos ($1.95), arguing that living costs such electricity, water, LNG and school fees have been rising and needed to be shouldered by workers.

“The 85-peso daily increase in NCR is essential if workers are to cope with the increasing cost of living, if they are to meet the basic needs of their families, and if the country is to give meaning and substance to the policy of equitable distribution of income and wealth,” TUCP President Victorino Balais said.

The current minimum wage in the National Capital region is pegged at 349.50 pesos ($8.02) per day and gets eroded by 2.7-3 per cent inflation and high costs of basic needs, the trade unions said. The minimum daily wage in Metro Manila is $10.74.

However, foreign investors said that they will not meet the  demands as they are “not only uncalled for, but they will harm the country’s investment levels and cost the jobs of thousands in the small and medium-sized enterprise sector.”

The Employers Confederation of the Philippines President Edgardo Lacson said that a rise at this time was “unnecessary and has no factual and legal basis”. He also said the workers’ calculations were “flawed”, according to local media reports.

The Department of Labour and Employment suggested that workers would be receiving “non-wage benefits including contractualisation, tax exemption and social protection” instead.



Support ASEAN news

Investvine has been a consistent voice in ASEAN news for more than a decade. From breaking news to exclusive interviews with key ASEAN leaders, we have brought you factual and engaging reports – the stories that matter, free of charge.

Like many news organisations, we are striving to survive in an age of reduced advertising and biased journalism. Our mission is to rise above today’s challenges and chart tomorrow’s world with clear, dependable reporting.

Support us now with a donation of your choosing. Your contribution will help us shine a light on important ASEAN stories, reach more people and lift the manifold voices of this dynamic, influential region.

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Personal Info

Donation Total: $10.00

 

 

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