Foreign business people flee Vietnam as riots escalate

Businessmen fleeingAs a result of violent Anti-Chinese riots in Vietnam that culminated in looting and setting fire to Chinese-owned factories, the airport in Ho Chi Minh was full of Chinese and Taiwanese on May 15 looking for flights out. Many of those who couldn’t get tickets stayed and bunkered down at the airport because they said it felt safer there than anywhere else.

The rioting, sparked initially by anger at aggressive moves by China to press its territorial claims to parts of the South China Sea near Vietnam, has hit businesses with no ties to the dispute, including those from Taiwan, Malaysia and Singapore. Even a Singaporean flag has been burnt by protesters for some reason. At least 21 people were killed – among them a number of Chinese nationals – and nearly 100 injured.

Some 600 Chinese were fleeing the violence over the border to Cambodia. Travel agencies in China and Hong Kong have suspended tours to Vietnam.

Vietnamese Prime Minister Nguyen Tan Dung has called on officials in the government to prevent further riots and punish lawbreakers and has urged help so affected businesses can resume operations.

Anti-Chinese sentiment in Vietnam has hit a formidable peak since Beijing’s deployment of an oil rig in disputed waters in the South China Sea on May 1. The Vietnamese government has issued stark warnings to the Chinese that this “aggression”, which had to date been met with Vietnamese diplomacy, would “turn ugly” if it continued.



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As a result of violent Anti-Chinese riots in Vietnam that culminated in looting and setting fire to Chinese-owned factories, the airport in Ho Chi Minh was full of Chinese and Taiwanese on May 15 looking for flights out. Many of those who couldn’t get tickets stayed and bunkered down at the airport because they said it felt safer there than anywhere else. The rioting, sparked initially by anger at aggressive moves by China to press its territorial claims to parts of the South China Sea near Vietnam, has hit businesses with no ties to the dispute, including those from Taiwan,...

Businessmen fleeingAs a result of violent Anti-Chinese riots in Vietnam that culminated in looting and setting fire to Chinese-owned factories, the airport in Ho Chi Minh was full of Chinese and Taiwanese on May 15 looking for flights out. Many of those who couldn’t get tickets stayed and bunkered down at the airport because they said it felt safer there than anywhere else.

The rioting, sparked initially by anger at aggressive moves by China to press its territorial claims to parts of the South China Sea near Vietnam, has hit businesses with no ties to the dispute, including those from Taiwan, Malaysia and Singapore. Even a Singaporean flag has been burnt by protesters for some reason. At least 21 people were killed – among them a number of Chinese nationals – and nearly 100 injured.

Some 600 Chinese were fleeing the violence over the border to Cambodia. Travel agencies in China and Hong Kong have suspended tours to Vietnam.

Vietnamese Prime Minister Nguyen Tan Dung has called on officials in the government to prevent further riots and punish lawbreakers and has urged help so affected businesses can resume operations.

Anti-Chinese sentiment in Vietnam has hit a formidable peak since Beijing’s deployment of an oil rig in disputed waters in the South China Sea on May 1. The Vietnamese government has issued stark warnings to the Chinese that this “aggression”, which had to date been met with Vietnamese diplomacy, would “turn ugly” if it continued.



Support ASEAN news

Investvine has been a consistent voice in ASEAN news for more than a decade. From breaking news to exclusive interviews with key ASEAN leaders, we have brought you factual and engaging reports – the stories that matter, free of charge.

Like many news organisations, we are striving to survive in an age of reduced advertising and biased journalism. Our mission is to rise above today’s challenges and chart tomorrow’s world with clear, dependable reporting.

Support us now with a donation of your choosing. Your contribution will help us shine a light on important ASEAN stories, reach more people and lift the manifold voices of this dynamic, influential region.

$
Personal Info

Donation Total: $10.00