‘Hard to implement Shariah laws in Malaysia’

Shariah lawIt is “almost” impossible to follow in Brunei’s footsteps and introduce Shariah laws in Malaysia, even as crime rates spike in the country, anti-crime groups say, according to a The Star report.

Recently, some Malaysians, both Muslim and non-Muslim, have called for such laws to be implemented as they think it would be a deterrent to criminals.

“People will welcome it if they think it can bring down the crime rate and make them feel safe,” said MyWatch adviser S. Gobikrishnan. However, he added it was “not possible” to implement them as the laws would only apply to Muslims, who comprise an estimated 60 per cent of the population.

“If we look beyond religion, it might work, but not in its current form,” he said.

The laws are called hudud, a term used in Shariah law to describe the class of punishment for crimes such as theft, fornication, adultery, consumption of alcohol and other intoxicants, as well as apostasy.

Criminologist Dr P. Sundramoorthy said it would be difficult to implement hudud laws in Malaysia because of the multiracial balance of the country, unlike Brunei, which was mainly homogeneous and pre-dominantly Muslim.

“Non-Muslims might think of it as a deterrent but it is too complex and complicated to be implemented in our diverse society,” he said, adding that the general philosophy of hudud was based on justness and fairness.

Brunei recently announced that it will enforce a Shariah penal code that included hudud (related to non-violent offences) and qisas (violent offences) penalties, although the oil-rich country faced opposition from human rights groups.

The new laws could include stoning to death for adultery and severing of limbs for theft, according to the copy of the code sighted by AFP. Hudud laws will apply only to Muslims, who make up almost 90 per cent of the population.

On social media platforms in Malaysia, many have suggested that the implementation of hudud will result in a drop of violent crime.



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It is "almost" impossible to follow in Brunei's footsteps and introduce Shariah laws in Malaysia, even as crime rates spike in the country, anti-crime groups say, according to a The Star report. Recently, some Malaysians, both Muslim and non-Muslim, have called for such laws to be implemented as they think it would be a deterrent to criminals. "People will welcome it if they think it can bring down the crime rate and make them feel safe," said MyWatch adviser S. Gobikrishnan. However, he added it was "not possible" to implement them as the laws would only apply to Muslims, who...

Shariah lawIt is “almost” impossible to follow in Brunei’s footsteps and introduce Shariah laws in Malaysia, even as crime rates spike in the country, anti-crime groups say, according to a The Star report.

Recently, some Malaysians, both Muslim and non-Muslim, have called for such laws to be implemented as they think it would be a deterrent to criminals.

“People will welcome it if they think it can bring down the crime rate and make them feel safe,” said MyWatch adviser S. Gobikrishnan. However, he added it was “not possible” to implement them as the laws would only apply to Muslims, who comprise an estimated 60 per cent of the population.

“If we look beyond religion, it might work, but not in its current form,” he said.

The laws are called hudud, a term used in Shariah law to describe the class of punishment for crimes such as theft, fornication, adultery, consumption of alcohol and other intoxicants, as well as apostasy.

Criminologist Dr P. Sundramoorthy said it would be difficult to implement hudud laws in Malaysia because of the multiracial balance of the country, unlike Brunei, which was mainly homogeneous and pre-dominantly Muslim.

“Non-Muslims might think of it as a deterrent but it is too complex and complicated to be implemented in our diverse society,” he said, adding that the general philosophy of hudud was based on justness and fairness.

Brunei recently announced that it will enforce a Shariah penal code that included hudud (related to non-violent offences) and qisas (violent offences) penalties, although the oil-rich country faced opposition from human rights groups.

The new laws could include stoning to death for adultery and severing of limbs for theft, according to the copy of the code sighted by AFP. Hudud laws will apply only to Muslims, who make up almost 90 per cent of the population.

On social media platforms in Malaysia, many have suggested that the implementation of hudud will result in a drop of violent crime.



Support ASEAN news

Investvine has been a consistent voice in ASEAN news for more than a decade. From breaking news to exclusive interviews with key ASEAN leaders, we have brought you factual and engaging reports – the stories that matter, free of charge.

Like many news organisations, we are striving to survive in an age of reduced advertising and biased journalism. Our mission is to rise above today’s challenges and chart tomorrow’s world with clear, dependable reporting.

Support us now with a donation of your choosing. Your contribution will help us shine a light on important ASEAN stories, reach more people and lift the manifold voices of this dynamic, influential region.

$
Personal Info

Donation Total: $10.00

 

 

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