Illegal streamers in Malaysia now face up to 20 years jail time for copyright infringements

Illegal streamers of copyrighted content might want to think twice about offering their services in Malaysia on the Internet and/or sell related hard- or software since it could land them in jail for a long time, according to TorrentFreak, a blog focusing on file sharing services.

Malaysia’s House of Representatives has passed amendments to the Copyright Act 1987 that will boost the country’s deterrent against those who facilitate access to pirated content via illegal streaming.

People who offer streaming services and devices that “prejudicially” hurt copyright owners are now facing fines between 10,000 ringgit ($2,370) and 200,000 ringgit ($47,410) or a whopping prison sentence of up to 20 years, or both.

The amendments are focused on those involved in the provision or facilitation of illegal streams. The term “streaming technology” is repeatedly referenced and for the purposes of the act this includes computer programs (apps and other software tools) and devices (streaming hardware of all kinds) that, in whole or in part, are used to infringe copyright in a protected work.

Companies should have an eye on rogue employees

The updated law also discourages companies from either participating in streaming piracy or tolerating its presence. Unless managers can show they were unaware of a violation and took “all due diligence” to stop such acts, they will be considered guilty of the relevant crime.

Copyright laws worldwide frequently cover digital piracy, but some of them were designed to tackle downloads and other, older forms of bootlegging. That was a problem for Malaysia, which so far could not use its Copyright Act against people selling piracy-oriented streaming devices until a High Court decision made room for those cases.

The potential punishments are strict, and the wording suggests it may be difficult for some companies to avoid entanglements with rogue employees, observers say.

Click here for details of the amendments.



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Illegal streamers of copyrighted content might want to think twice about offering their services in Malaysia on the Internet and/or sell related hard- or software since it could land them in jail for a long time, according to TorrentFreak, a blog focusing on file sharing services. Malaysia's House of Representatives has passed amendments to the Copyright Act 1987 that will boost the country’s deterrent against those who facilitate access to pirated content via illegal streaming. People who offer streaming services and devices that “prejudicially” hurt copyright owners are now facing fines between 10,000 ringgit ($2,370) and 200,000 ringgit ($47,410) or...

Illegal streamers of copyrighted content might want to think twice about offering their services in Malaysia on the Internet and/or sell related hard- or software since it could land them in jail for a long time, according to TorrentFreak, a blog focusing on file sharing services.

Malaysia’s House of Representatives has passed amendments to the Copyright Act 1987 that will boost the country’s deterrent against those who facilitate access to pirated content via illegal streaming.

People who offer streaming services and devices that “prejudicially” hurt copyright owners are now facing fines between 10,000 ringgit ($2,370) and 200,000 ringgit ($47,410) or a whopping prison sentence of up to 20 years, or both.

The amendments are focused on those involved in the provision or facilitation of illegal streams. The term “streaming technology” is repeatedly referenced and for the purposes of the act this includes computer programs (apps and other software tools) and devices (streaming hardware of all kinds) that, in whole or in part, are used to infringe copyright in a protected work.

Companies should have an eye on rogue employees

The updated law also discourages companies from either participating in streaming piracy or tolerating its presence. Unless managers can show they were unaware of a violation and took “all due diligence” to stop such acts, they will be considered guilty of the relevant crime.

Copyright laws worldwide frequently cover digital piracy, but some of them were designed to tackle downloads and other, older forms of bootlegging. That was a problem for Malaysia, which so far could not use its Copyright Act against people selling piracy-oriented streaming devices until a High Court decision made room for those cases.

The potential punishments are strict, and the wording suggests it may be difficult for some companies to avoid entanglements with rogue employees, observers say.

Click here for details of the amendments.



Support ASEAN news

Investvine has been a consistent voice in ASEAN news for more than a decade. From breaking news to exclusive interviews with key ASEAN leaders, we have brought you factual and engaging reports – the stories that matter, free of charge.

Like many news organisations, we are striving to survive in an age of reduced advertising and biased journalism. Our mission is to rise above today’s challenges and chart tomorrow’s world with clear, dependable reporting.

Support us now with a donation of your choosing. Your contribution will help us shine a light on important ASEAN stories, reach more people and lift the manifold voices of this dynamic, influential region.

 

 

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