Indonesia and India named world’s biggest shark killers

sharksIn July, a European Union-sponsored study found that Indonesia and India kill the most sharks of all countries. The purpose of the study was to determine how to implement an international agreement to limit the fishing of endangered sharks and rays.

Indonesia and India together account for one-fifth of all shark catches, according to the wildlife trade monitoring organisation TRAFFIC. The next most deadly countries for sharks are, in descending order, Spain, Taiwan, Argentina, Mexico, the United States, Malaysia, Pakistan, Brazil, Japan, France, New Zealand, Thailand, Portugal, Nigeria, Iran, Sri Lanka, South Korea and Yemen.

Global shark populations have been dramatically reduced on account of surging demand for shark fins and meat in several countries, including China and Thailand, according to AFP. The sudden decline of sharks from the food chain has led to unsustainable growth in species that sharks feed on, such as jellyfish. Thus shark overfishing has destabilizing ripple effects on a variety of global fishing and marine operations.

The EU report was commissioned following the listing of seven species of sharks and rays by the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species (CITES) last March. The CITES was successful in achieving international agreement on conservation goals, but not on implementation methods. Thus it is up to the EU and other organisations to determine how to put the CITES agreement into effect.

The CITES agreement seeks to regulate and impose limits on the capture of the ocean white tip shark, porbeagle shark, three species of hammerhead shark and two species of manta rays, which are all classified as endangered. The first step, which the EU study just accomplished, was to determine which countries are most responsible. The next will be figuring out what to do about it. Expect step number two to be rather complicated.



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In July, a European Union-sponsored study found that Indonesia and India kill the most sharks of all countries. The purpose of the study was to determine how to implement an international agreement to limit the fishing of endangered sharks and rays. Indonesia and India together account for one-fifth of all shark catches, according to the wildlife trade monitoring organisation TRAFFIC. The next most deadly countries for sharks are, in descending order, Spain, Taiwan, Argentina, Mexico, the United States, Malaysia, Pakistan, Brazil, Japan, France, New Zealand, Thailand, Portugal, Nigeria, Iran, Sri Lanka, South Korea and Yemen. Global shark populations have been...

sharksIn July, a European Union-sponsored study found that Indonesia and India kill the most sharks of all countries. The purpose of the study was to determine how to implement an international agreement to limit the fishing of endangered sharks and rays.

Indonesia and India together account for one-fifth of all shark catches, according to the wildlife trade monitoring organisation TRAFFIC. The next most deadly countries for sharks are, in descending order, Spain, Taiwan, Argentina, Mexico, the United States, Malaysia, Pakistan, Brazil, Japan, France, New Zealand, Thailand, Portugal, Nigeria, Iran, Sri Lanka, South Korea and Yemen.

Global shark populations have been dramatically reduced on account of surging demand for shark fins and meat in several countries, including China and Thailand, according to AFP. The sudden decline of sharks from the food chain has led to unsustainable growth in species that sharks feed on, such as jellyfish. Thus shark overfishing has destabilizing ripple effects on a variety of global fishing and marine operations.

The EU report was commissioned following the listing of seven species of sharks and rays by the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species (CITES) last March. The CITES was successful in achieving international agreement on conservation goals, but not on implementation methods. Thus it is up to the EU and other organisations to determine how to put the CITES agreement into effect.

The CITES agreement seeks to regulate and impose limits on the capture of the ocean white tip shark, porbeagle shark, three species of hammerhead shark and two species of manta rays, which are all classified as endangered. The first step, which the EU study just accomplished, was to determine which countries are most responsible. The next will be figuring out what to do about it. Expect step number two to be rather complicated.



Support ASEAN news

Investvine has been a consistent voice in ASEAN news for more than a decade. From breaking news to exclusive interviews with key ASEAN leaders, we have brought you factual and engaging reports – the stories that matter, free of charge.

Like many news organisations, we are striving to survive in an age of reduced advertising and biased journalism. Our mission is to rise above today’s challenges and chart tomorrow’s world with clear, dependable reporting.

Support us now with a donation of your choosing. Your contribution will help us shine a light on important ASEAN stories, reach more people and lift the manifold voices of this dynamic, influential region.

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