Indonesia elections: Widodo takes double-digit lead in early counts

Reading Time: 2 minutes
Indonesia Elections: Widodo Leading Comfortably In Early Counts

Indonesia’s incumbent President Joko Widodo looks likely to have secured a comfortable win over his rival in Indonesian elections, according to unofficial “quick counts” on the evening of election day, April 17.

The counts, conducted by several credible polling agencies, show the incumbent president ahead of his political rival, the former Special Forces commander Prabowo Subianto, by up to eleven percentage points.

The counts put Widodo on around 55 per cent of the vote, with Prabowo winning around 44 per cent. The preliminary results have proven correct in previous elections in Indonesia. Final official results will be announced by May 22.

Most pre-election opinion polls had given Widodo a double-digit lead, despite criticism from analysts and former supporters who claim he has failed to deliver on certain issues. While as president, Widodo has impressed voters with his commitment to building infrastructure and expanding social welfare, he has drawn criticism for failing to address past human rights abuses, inequality and chronic corruption, and most recently for leveraging the state apparatus, including law enforcement agencies and Islamic groups, to solidify his support base, as well as for having compromised his values of pluralism to score political points.

In fact, there had been a feeling on the ground that it is a closer race than predicted. In the bitterly divisive election of 2014, Widodo defeated Prabowo by six percentage points.

Some 192.8 million people were eligible to vote across the archipelago’s 17,000 islands in what is the world’s biggest direct presidential election. It’s been billed as one of the most complicated single-day ballots ever under taken. For the first time, Indonesia held its presidential and legislative elections on the same day, with more than 245,000 candidates running for over 20,000 seats. More than 800,000 polling stations and six million election workers helped to pull it off.

Share your vote!


Do you like this post?
  • Fascinated
  • Happy
  • Sad
  • Angry
  • Bored
  • Afraid

Indonesia’s incumbent President Joko Widodo looks likely to have secured a comfortable win over his rival in Indonesian elections, according to unofficial “quick counts” on the evening of election day, April 17. The counts, conducted by several credible polling agencies, show the incumbent president ahead of his political rival, the former Special Forces commander Prabowo Subianto, by up to eleven percentage points. The counts put Widodo on around 55 per cent of the vote, with Prabowo winning around 44 per cent. The preliminary results have proven correct in previous elections in Indonesia. Final official results will be announced by May...

Reading Time: 2 minutes

Indonesia Elections: Widodo Leading Comfortably In Early Counts

Indonesia’s incumbent President Joko Widodo looks likely to have secured a comfortable win over his rival in Indonesian elections, according to unofficial “quick counts” on the evening of election day, April 17.

The counts, conducted by several credible polling agencies, show the incumbent president ahead of his political rival, the former Special Forces commander Prabowo Subianto, by up to eleven percentage points.

The counts put Widodo on around 55 per cent of the vote, with Prabowo winning around 44 per cent. The preliminary results have proven correct in previous elections in Indonesia. Final official results will be announced by May 22.

Most pre-election opinion polls had given Widodo a double-digit lead, despite criticism from analysts and former supporters who claim he has failed to deliver on certain issues. While as president, Widodo has impressed voters with his commitment to building infrastructure and expanding social welfare, he has drawn criticism for failing to address past human rights abuses, inequality and chronic corruption, and most recently for leveraging the state apparatus, including law enforcement agencies and Islamic groups, to solidify his support base, as well as for having compromised his values of pluralism to score political points.

In fact, there had been a feeling on the ground that it is a closer race than predicted. In the bitterly divisive election of 2014, Widodo defeated Prabowo by six percentage points.

Some 192.8 million people were eligible to vote across the archipelago’s 17,000 islands in what is the world’s biggest direct presidential election. It’s been billed as one of the most complicated single-day ballots ever under taken. For the first time, Indonesia held its presidential and legislative elections on the same day, with more than 245,000 candidates running for over 20,000 seats. More than 800,000 polling stations and six million election workers helped to pull it off.

Share your vote!


Do you like this post?
  • Fascinated
  • Happy
  • Sad
  • Angry
  • Bored
  • Afraid