Indonesia expects substantial baby boom following coronavirus lockdown

The Indonesian government, more precisely the country’s National Population and Family Planning Board (BKKBN), is expecting a baby boom from the coronavirus lockdown as it assumes that people were busy making babies when staying at home most of the time in a country where condoms and other forms of birth control are unavailable to a large number of people, even though contraception is, in principle, not forbidden by Islam.

Indonesia, the world’s fourth-most populous nation behind China, India and the US, is home to nearly 270 million inhabitants, with 4.8 million births annually.

The decline in contraceptive use during the coronavirus crisis could push up pregnancies by around 420,000 within one to three months, the BKKBN estimated. A further drop of birth control measures would increase pregnancies by more than 800,000 within another few months.

The decrease occurred across all kinds of methods, including contraceptive implants, injections and vasectomy, the agency’s chief Hasto Wardoyo said. Implants were down by 40 per cent, for instance, while vasectomies plunged by 90 per cent.

“With the pandemic, the access to contraception in general has shrunk. Many clinics have shut, while those that remain open have limited the number of people they serve,” he told The Straits Times.

Clinics closed, no more free contraceptives

This also limits the access of low-income earners to contraceptive pills, which they normally can get free from BKKBN via clinics and midwives.

Hasto noted that unwanted pregnancies could take a psychological toll on women and have longer-term repercussions, such as stunted development in children of poor families that cannot afford proper nutrition.

The pandemic was “bad timing” for women to get pregnant as many were unable to obtain proper healthcare services, he added.

Demographic experts also say that a rise in pregnancies will likely occur mostly among women from low-income families who largely depend on free contraception provided by the BKKBN, as well as young women who lost their jobs in cities, returned to home towns and were forced into marriage by social norms.

Hasto said that BKKBN was deploying its family field officers to give out free condoms and contraceptive pills while distributing food aid to poor families. The agency will also kick off a campaign to recruit one million new families to get familiar with birth control methods starting from June.



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The Indonesian government, more precisely the country’s National Population and Family Planning Board (BKKBN), is expecting a baby boom from the coronavirus lockdown as it assumes that people were busy making babies when staying at home most of the time in a country where condoms and other forms of birth control are unavailable to a large number of people, even though contraception is, in principle, not forbidden by Islam. Indonesia, the world’s fourth-most populous nation behind China, India and the US, is home to nearly 270 million inhabitants, with 4.8 million births annually. The decline in contraceptive use during the...

The Indonesian government, more precisely the country’s National Population and Family Planning Board (BKKBN), is expecting a baby boom from the coronavirus lockdown as it assumes that people were busy making babies when staying at home most of the time in a country where condoms and other forms of birth control are unavailable to a large number of people, even though contraception is, in principle, not forbidden by Islam.

Indonesia, the world’s fourth-most populous nation behind China, India and the US, is home to nearly 270 million inhabitants, with 4.8 million births annually.

The decline in contraceptive use during the coronavirus crisis could push up pregnancies by around 420,000 within one to three months, the BKKBN estimated. A further drop of birth control measures would increase pregnancies by more than 800,000 within another few months.

The decrease occurred across all kinds of methods, including contraceptive implants, injections and vasectomy, the agency’s chief Hasto Wardoyo said. Implants were down by 40 per cent, for instance, while vasectomies plunged by 90 per cent.

“With the pandemic, the access to contraception in general has shrunk. Many clinics have shut, while those that remain open have limited the number of people they serve,” he told The Straits Times.

Clinics closed, no more free contraceptives

This also limits the access of low-income earners to contraceptive pills, which they normally can get free from BKKBN via clinics and midwives.

Hasto noted that unwanted pregnancies could take a psychological toll on women and have longer-term repercussions, such as stunted development in children of poor families that cannot afford proper nutrition.

The pandemic was “bad timing” for women to get pregnant as many were unable to obtain proper healthcare services, he added.

Demographic experts also say that a rise in pregnancies will likely occur mostly among women from low-income families who largely depend on free contraception provided by the BKKBN, as well as young women who lost their jobs in cities, returned to home towns and were forced into marriage by social norms.

Hasto said that BKKBN was deploying its family field officers to give out free condoms and contraceptive pills while distributing food aid to poor families. The agency will also kick off a campaign to recruit one million new families to get familiar with birth control methods starting from June.



Support ASEAN news

Investvine has been a consistent voice in ASEAN news for more than a decade. From breaking news to exclusive interviews with key ASEAN leaders, we have brought you factual and engaging reports – the stories that matter, free of charge.

Like many news organisations, we are striving to survive in an age of reduced advertising and biased journalism. Our mission is to rise above today’s challenges and chart tomorrow’s world with clear, dependable reporting.

Support us now with a donation of your choosing. Your contribution will help us shine a light on important ASEAN stories, reach more people and lift the manifold voices of this dynamic, influential region.

$
Personal Info

Donation Total: $10.00

 

 

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