Indonesia wants to buy used fighter jets from Austria


Indonesia has offered Austria to buy the European nation’s dated Eurofighter Typhoon fighter jet fleet which is for sale or to be retired this year due to operational costs and corruption in the procurement of the planes.

Indonesia’s minister of defense Prabowo Subianto has sent an official letter to his ministerial colleague in Austria, Klaudia Tanner, that his country was interested in acquiring the 15 jets as it seeks to “modernise” its own fighter jet fleet with the 18-year old Eurofighters, Austrian daily Die Presse reported.

“I am aware of the sensitivity of the matter,” the minister apparently alluded to the painful story that links Austria to the Eurofighter supersonic jets. He said he knew the circumstances of the Eurofighter purchase by Austria in 2002 and its effects to the present day.

“Nevertheless, I am sure that my offer offers opportunities for both sides,” Subianto said, indicating that he would prefer the Eurofighters over French Dassault Rafale or Russion Sukhoi Su-35 jets which are also on Indonesia’s shortlist.

Murky purchase deal involving Airbus’ defense unit, formerly EADS

It is known in defense circles that minister Tanner is not a friend of the 15 Eurofighters that are currently securing airspace in Austria. She would like to get rid of the planes, reverse the nearly €2-billion purchase contract for alleged corruption in the sales process and murky offset deals and seek compensation from manufacturer Airbus.

However, to do this the country first has to win a lengthy legal dispute with Airbus and prove that the Austrian government was fooled by the purchase, which is a lengthy legal process with an unforeseeable outcome.

No price for the used Eurofighter jet fleet has been named yet, but it has been determined that Austria is seeking compensation of up to €1.1 billion from Airbus.

Commentators have said that the twin-engine, supersonic warplanes were actually unnecessary in light of the defense needs of Austria which is a neutral country without immediate enemies, and they were also way too expensive for the government’s modest military budget and rarely fly anyway.

Thus, it came as no surprise that, in 2017, the Austrian government announced it would retire the Typhoons as early as 2020 and replace them with more-affordable planes.

This also means that, despite the fighters’ age, they are not as worn as they would be if flown more frequently and could have a higher second-hand value.



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Indonesia has offered Austria to buy the European nation’s dated Eurofighter Typhoon fighter jet fleet which is for sale or to be retired this year due to operational costs and corruption in the procurement of the planes. Indonesia’s minister of defense Prabowo Subianto has sent an official letter to his ministerial colleague in Austria, Klaudia Tanner, that his country was interested in acquiring the 15 jets as it seeks to “modernise” its own fighter jet fleet with the 18-year old Eurofighters, Austrian daily Die Presse reported. “I am aware of the sensitivity of the matter,” the minister apparently alluded to...


Indonesia has offered Austria to buy the European nation’s dated Eurofighter Typhoon fighter jet fleet which is for sale or to be retired this year due to operational costs and corruption in the procurement of the planes.

Indonesia’s minister of defense Prabowo Subianto has sent an official letter to his ministerial colleague in Austria, Klaudia Tanner, that his country was interested in acquiring the 15 jets as it seeks to “modernise” its own fighter jet fleet with the 18-year old Eurofighters, Austrian daily Die Presse reported.

“I am aware of the sensitivity of the matter,” the minister apparently alluded to the painful story that links Austria to the Eurofighter supersonic jets. He said he knew the circumstances of the Eurofighter purchase by Austria in 2002 and its effects to the present day.

“Nevertheless, I am sure that my offer offers opportunities for both sides,” Subianto said, indicating that he would prefer the Eurofighters over French Dassault Rafale or Russion Sukhoi Su-35 jets which are also on Indonesia’s shortlist.

Murky purchase deal involving Airbus’ defense unit, formerly EADS

It is known in defense circles that minister Tanner is not a friend of the 15 Eurofighters that are currently securing airspace in Austria. She would like to get rid of the planes, reverse the nearly €2-billion purchase contract for alleged corruption in the sales process and murky offset deals and seek compensation from manufacturer Airbus.

However, to do this the country first has to win a lengthy legal dispute with Airbus and prove that the Austrian government was fooled by the purchase, which is a lengthy legal process with an unforeseeable outcome.

No price for the used Eurofighter jet fleet has been named yet, but it has been determined that Austria is seeking compensation of up to €1.1 billion from Airbus.

Commentators have said that the twin-engine, supersonic warplanes were actually unnecessary in light of the defense needs of Austria which is a neutral country without immediate enemies, and they were also way too expensive for the government’s modest military budget and rarely fly anyway.

Thus, it came as no surprise that, in 2017, the Austrian government announced it would retire the Typhoons as early as 2020 and replace them with more-affordable planes.

This also means that, despite the fighters’ age, they are not as worn as they would be if flown more frequently and could have a higher second-hand value.



Support ASEAN news

Investvine has been a consistent voice in ASEAN news for more than a decade. From breaking news to exclusive interviews with key ASEAN leaders, we have brought you factual and engaging reports – the stories that matter, free of charge.

Like many news organisations, we are striving to survive in an age of reduced advertising and biased journalism. Our mission is to rise above today’s challenges and chart tomorrow’s world with clear, dependable reporting.

Support us now with a donation of your choosing. Your contribution will help us shine a light on important ASEAN stories, reach more people and lift the manifold voices of this dynamic, influential region.

$
Personal Info

Donation Total: $10.00

 

 

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