Laos and Thailand resume border talks

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laos borderThailand and Laos will return to the negotiating table next month to discuss their unresolved border issues. According to a press release from the Thai Foreign Ministry, Thailand will host the Thai-Lao Joint Boundary Commission on August 15-16 in Bangkok.

It has been six years since talks fell apart, and both sides have acknowledged that resolving the remaining ambiguity over their shared border is in their mutual interest. The countries share a 500-mile border, and about 96 per cent of it has been demarcated. Completing the demarcation would simplify the flow of trade and allow for the construction of more checkpoints.

Thailand and Laos fought a 3-month war over this border between December 1987 and February 1988. It began with a dispute over a map drawn in 1907 by a French surveyor that arbitrarily divided Siam and French Indochina, which were then under French colonial rule.

The dispute centered primarily around ownership of the village of Ban Romkloa. In December 1987, Thai armed forces occupied Ban Romklao, and raised the Thai flag over it. Lao soldiers staged a night raid, drove the Thai soldiers from the village, and replaced the Thai flag with the flag of PDR Laos. In the fighting that followed, 1,000 people were killed before both sides agreed to a cease-fire.

Festering resentments have prevented this relatively minor border dispute from being resolved. Perhaps now enough time has passed that everyone is ready to just get on with their lives.

Thai version of this article
ภาษาไทย



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Thailand and Laos will return to the negotiating table next month to discuss their unresolved border issues. According to a press release from the Thai Foreign Ministry, Thailand will host the Thai-Lao Joint Boundary Commission on August 15-16 in Bangkok. It has been six years since talks fell apart, and both sides have acknowledged that resolving the remaining ambiguity over their shared border is in their mutual interest. The countries share a 500-mile border, and about 96 per cent of it has been demarcated. Completing the demarcation would simplify the flow of trade and allow for the construction of more...

laos borderThailand and Laos will return to the negotiating table next month to discuss their unresolved border issues. According to a press release from the Thai Foreign Ministry, Thailand will host the Thai-Lao Joint Boundary Commission on August 15-16 in Bangkok.

It has been six years since talks fell apart, and both sides have acknowledged that resolving the remaining ambiguity over their shared border is in their mutual interest. The countries share a 500-mile border, and about 96 per cent of it has been demarcated. Completing the demarcation would simplify the flow of trade and allow for the construction of more checkpoints.

Thailand and Laos fought a 3-month war over this border between December 1987 and February 1988. It began with a dispute over a map drawn in 1907 by a French surveyor that arbitrarily divided Siam and French Indochina, which were then under French colonial rule.

The dispute centered primarily around ownership of the village of Ban Romkloa. In December 1987, Thai armed forces occupied Ban Romklao, and raised the Thai flag over it. Lao soldiers staged a night raid, drove the Thai soldiers from the village, and replaced the Thai flag with the flag of PDR Laos. In the fighting that followed, 1,000 people were killed before both sides agreed to a cease-fire.

Festering resentments have prevented this relatively minor border dispute from being resolved. Perhaps now enough time has passed that everyone is ready to just get on with their lives.

Thai version of this article
ภาษาไทย



Support ASEAN news

Investvine has been a consistent voice in ASEAN news for more than a decade. From breaking news to exclusive interviews with key ASEAN leaders, we have brought you factual and engaging reports – the stories that matter, free of charge.

Like many news organisations, we are striving to survive in an age of reduced advertising and biased journalism. Our mission is to rise above today’s challenges and chart tomorrow’s world with clear, dependable reporting.

Support us now with a donation of your choosing. Your contribution will help us shine a light on important ASEAN stories, reach more people and lift the manifold voices of this dynamic, influential region.

$
Personal Info

Donation Total: $10.00

 

 

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