Malaysia facing emergency rule and suspension of parliament

Malaysia’s Prime Minister Muhyiddin Yassin

Malaysia’s Prime Minister Muhyiddin Yassin on October 24 has proposed to the country’s King Al-Sultan Abdullah to declare a state of emergency in order to tackle the surge in Covid-19 infections and to manage what he called “political instability.”

The king will meet the country’s sultans to discuss the proposals, the palace said, without elaborating on their content.

The emergency rule would lead to the suspension of parliament, Reuters cited sources. The proposal has been widely condemned by the country’s opposition politicians and greeted with alarm by Malaysians. Among others, opposition leader Anwar Ibrahim denounced the move as an attempt by the premier to cling to power amid a power struggle.

The proposal comes as Malaysia sees a resurgence in coronavirus cases and as Muhyiddin faces a leadership challenge from Anwar, who last month said he had majority support in parliament to oust the premier.

Anwar said he was “deeply concerned” by the reports of an emergency rule.

“A state of emergency is declared when there is a threat to our national security. But when the government is itself the source of that threat, then a state of emergency is nothing more than the descent into dictatorship and authoritarianism,” he noted.

Elections can be postponed under emergency rule

An emergency rule means for Malaysia that parliament can be suspended and the federal government would be empowered to push through policies that it would normally not be able to. Any planned by-elections and a general election can be postponed.

However, there is a big question mark over whether Muhyiddin has enough support in parliament. There are worries that a general election could be called even as the number of Covid-19 cases continues to rise, should his coalition collapse if he fails to pass next year’s budget on November 6 due to a lack of support in parliament.

Malaysia was ruled under an emergency decree for four times in the past, owing to race struggles, a confrontation with Indonesia in 1964, and power struggles between political parties.

UPDATE: King Al Sultan-Abdullah on October 25 rejected the proposal for a state of emergency, saying the he believes the government has handled the coronavirus pandemic well and was also capable of continuing to manage the political crisis.



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Malaysia's Prime Minister Muhyiddin Yassin Malaysia’s Prime Minister Muhyiddin Yassin on October 24 has proposed to the country’s King Al-Sultan Abdullah to declare a state of emergency in order to tackle the surge in Covid-19 infections and to manage what he called “political instability.” The king will meet the country’s sultans to discuss the proposals, the palace said, without elaborating on their content. The emergency rule would lead to the suspension of parliament, Reuters cited sources. The proposal has been widely condemned by the country’s opposition politicians and greeted with alarm by Malaysians. Among others, opposition leader Anwar Ibrahim denounced...

Malaysia’s Prime Minister Muhyiddin Yassin

Malaysia’s Prime Minister Muhyiddin Yassin on October 24 has proposed to the country’s King Al-Sultan Abdullah to declare a state of emergency in order to tackle the surge in Covid-19 infections and to manage what he called “political instability.”

The king will meet the country’s sultans to discuss the proposals, the palace said, without elaborating on their content.

The emergency rule would lead to the suspension of parliament, Reuters cited sources. The proposal has been widely condemned by the country’s opposition politicians and greeted with alarm by Malaysians. Among others, opposition leader Anwar Ibrahim denounced the move as an attempt by the premier to cling to power amid a power struggle.

The proposal comes as Malaysia sees a resurgence in coronavirus cases and as Muhyiddin faces a leadership challenge from Anwar, who last month said he had majority support in parliament to oust the premier.

Anwar said he was “deeply concerned” by the reports of an emergency rule.

“A state of emergency is declared when there is a threat to our national security. But when the government is itself the source of that threat, then a state of emergency is nothing more than the descent into dictatorship and authoritarianism,” he noted.

Elections can be postponed under emergency rule

An emergency rule means for Malaysia that parliament can be suspended and the federal government would be empowered to push through policies that it would normally not be able to. Any planned by-elections and a general election can be postponed.

However, there is a big question mark over whether Muhyiddin has enough support in parliament. There are worries that a general election could be called even as the number of Covid-19 cases continues to rise, should his coalition collapse if he fails to pass next year’s budget on November 6 due to a lack of support in parliament.

Malaysia was ruled under an emergency decree for four times in the past, owing to race struggles, a confrontation with Indonesia in 1964, and power struggles between political parties.

UPDATE: King Al Sultan-Abdullah on October 25 rejected the proposal for a state of emergency, saying the he believes the government has handled the coronavirus pandemic well and was also capable of continuing to manage the political crisis.



Support ASEAN news

Investvine has been a consistent voice in ASEAN news for more than a decade. From breaking news to exclusive interviews with key ASEAN leaders, we have brought you factual and engaging reports – the stories that matter, free of charge.

Like many news organisations, we are striving to survive in an age of reduced advertising and biased journalism. Our mission is to rise above today’s challenges and chart tomorrow’s world with clear, dependable reporting.

Support us now with a donation of your choosing. Your contribution will help us shine a light on important ASEAN stories, reach more people and lift the manifold voices of this dynamic, influential region.

$
Personal Info

Donation Total: $10.00

 

 

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