Malaysia, Indonesia get strict on booze

Southeast Asia’s Muslim-majority nations Malaysia and Indonesia are getting stricter on the sale and consumption of alcohol with new rules and guidelines either being introduced or in the making.

Malaysia, as a start, has set new regulations on liquor selling and liquor licenses in the capital Kuala Lumpur. Among the new directives are that sundry and grocery shops, convenience stores and Chinese medical shops will not be allowed to sell hard liquor from October 1, 2021.

According to the directive, businesses that sell liquor are not allowed to be located in front of police stations, places of worship, schools and hospitals. Establishments must also display their liquor license at the entrance. A blue license means you can drink in the premises and a yellow license means alcohol is for take-away only.

Pure or mixed liquor products in traditional medicine, mainly found in Chinese medical shops, will be exempt from the ruling.

Low-alcohol drinks such as beers will still be available for sale from 7am with a 9pm deadline in the city, while big supermarkets and wholesalers will still be allowed to sell hard liquor.

In turn, according to the new regulations, bars and other establishments will be allowed to serve alcohol like normal with a cutoff time of 12am unless they have an additional license that allows them to serve until 2am.

The production and consumption of Samsu, some sort of moonshine liquor with a near-to-toxic alcohol content, will be completely ruled out in Kuala Lumpur, starting December 15, 2020.

Alcohol ban feared to give tourism industry in Indonesia the finishing blow

Meanwhile, in Indonesia, parliament has resumed debating a bill to ban alcohol from being consumed by residents and tourists on the nation’s many islands.

The Prohibition of Alcoholic Drinks Bill is being proposed by the conservative Islam-based United Development Party and the Prosperous Justice Party.

The Jakarta Post reported the party is proposing the bill to “keep the public from harm, create order, protect the public from alcoholics and create awareness about the dangers of alcohol consumption”.

Under the proposed new laws, which first came up in 2016, alcohol would be banned across the country. It would mean distributing alcohol is punishable with ten years in prison and consuming alcohol is punishable with three years in prison.

Naturally, the revival of the alcohol ban bill has raised fears that it could cripple a tourism industry already reeling from COVID-19, particularly at popular holiday spots such as Bali.

“How are we supposed to revive tourism in Bali, or in Indonesia? Not only international tourists but also domestic tourists will think why should they go to Bali for a holiday when they can’t even enjoy a bottle of beer?” the Sydney Morning Herald quoted a hotelier in Bali as saying.



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Southeast Asia’s Muslim-majority nations Malaysia and Indonesia are getting stricter on the sale and consumption of alcohol with new rules and guidelines either being introduced or in the making. Malaysia, as a start, has set new regulations on liquor selling and liquor licenses in the capital Kuala Lumpur. Among the new directives are that sundry and grocery shops, convenience stores and Chinese medical shops will not be allowed to sell hard liquor from October 1, 2021. According to the directive, businesses that sell liquor are not allowed to be located in front of police stations, places of worship, schools and...

Southeast Asia’s Muslim-majority nations Malaysia and Indonesia are getting stricter on the sale and consumption of alcohol with new rules and guidelines either being introduced or in the making.

Malaysia, as a start, has set new regulations on liquor selling and liquor licenses in the capital Kuala Lumpur. Among the new directives are that sundry and grocery shops, convenience stores and Chinese medical shops will not be allowed to sell hard liquor from October 1, 2021.

According to the directive, businesses that sell liquor are not allowed to be located in front of police stations, places of worship, schools and hospitals. Establishments must also display their liquor license at the entrance. A blue license means you can drink in the premises and a yellow license means alcohol is for take-away only.

Pure or mixed liquor products in traditional medicine, mainly found in Chinese medical shops, will be exempt from the ruling.

Low-alcohol drinks such as beers will still be available for sale from 7am with a 9pm deadline in the city, while big supermarkets and wholesalers will still be allowed to sell hard liquor.

In turn, according to the new regulations, bars and other establishments will be allowed to serve alcohol like normal with a cutoff time of 12am unless they have an additional license that allows them to serve until 2am.

The production and consumption of Samsu, some sort of moonshine liquor with a near-to-toxic alcohol content, will be completely ruled out in Kuala Lumpur, starting December 15, 2020.

Alcohol ban feared to give tourism industry in Indonesia the finishing blow

Meanwhile, in Indonesia, parliament has resumed debating a bill to ban alcohol from being consumed by residents and tourists on the nation’s many islands.

The Prohibition of Alcoholic Drinks Bill is being proposed by the conservative Islam-based United Development Party and the Prosperous Justice Party.

The Jakarta Post reported the party is proposing the bill to “keep the public from harm, create order, protect the public from alcoholics and create awareness about the dangers of alcohol consumption”.

Under the proposed new laws, which first came up in 2016, alcohol would be banned across the country. It would mean distributing alcohol is punishable with ten years in prison and consuming alcohol is punishable with three years in prison.

Naturally, the revival of the alcohol ban bill has raised fears that it could cripple a tourism industry already reeling from COVID-19, particularly at popular holiday spots such as Bali.

“How are we supposed to revive tourism in Bali, or in Indonesia? Not only international tourists but also domestic tourists will think why should they go to Bali for a holiday when they can’t even enjoy a bottle of beer?” the Sydney Morning Herald quoted a hotelier in Bali as saying.



Support ASEAN news

Investvine has been a consistent voice in ASEAN news for more than a decade. From breaking news to exclusive interviews with key ASEAN leaders, we have brought you factual and engaging reports – the stories that matter, free of charge.

Like many news organisations, we are striving to survive in an age of reduced advertising and biased journalism. Our mission is to rise above today’s challenges and chart tomorrow’s world with clear, dependable reporting.

Support us now with a donation of your choosing. Your contribution will help us shine a light on important ASEAN stories, reach more people and lift the manifold voices of this dynamic, influential region.

$
Personal Info

Donation Total: $10.00

 

 

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