Malaysia gets new prime minister

Malaysia’s king has chosen a new prime minister on August 20 in accordance with nominations of lawmakers, naming the former deputy prime minister under the previous administration, Ismail Sabri Yaakob, the country’s new leader.

The choice from a number of potential candidates has been widely expected. Ismail’s appointment marks the return of the United Malaysia National Organisation, or UMNO, which lost the 2018 general elections, to the country’s premiership. Ismail is a core member of the party and his nomination essentially restores the rule of UMNO, which had led Malaysia since independence from Britain in 1957 but was ousted in 2018 elections over a multibillion-dollar financial scandal.

Ismail had secured the backing of 114 lawmakers for a slender majority. He will be sworn in as Malaysia’s ninth prime minister on August 21.

The 114 votes exceed the 111 needed for a simple majority but are close to the backing the previous prime minister Muhyiddin Yassin had and was unable to preserve.

Not all are happy with the choice

However, Malaysians unsatisfied with the choice have launched an online petition to protest Ismail’s nomination, with more than 340,000 signatures collected so far. Many believe Ismail’s choice will restore the status quo, with its perceived as failed response to a worsening Covid-19 pandemic, among other shortcomings.

A lawyer before he joined politics, Ismail held several ministerial posts in previous UMNO governments. In 2015 as trade minister, Ismail caused controversy when he urged ethnic Malay consumers to boycott profiteering Chinese businesses. He was also slammed for supporting the vaping industry, which is dominated by Malays, despite warnings from the health ministry.

Political programme for Malays

In 2018 polls, Ismail waved the racial card, warning that every vote for the opposition was akin to eliminating special privileges given to Malays under a decades-old affirmative action program.

Ismail was named defense minister when Muhyiddin took power in March 202, and became the government’s public face through daily briefings on security issues related to the pandemic. He was promoted to deputy prime minister in July as Muhyiddin sought to woo support from UMNO, which was unhappy at playing second fiddle to Muhyiddin’s smaller party.



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Malaysia’s king has chosen a new prime minister on August 20 in accordance with nominations of lawmakers, naming the former deputy prime minister under the previous administration, Ismail Sabri Yaakob, the country’s new leader. The choice from a number of potential candidates has been widely expected. Ismail’s appointment marks the return of the United Malaysia National Organisation, or UMNO, which lost the 2018 general elections, to the country’s premiership. Ismail is a core member of the party and his nomination essentially restores the rule of UMNO, which had led Malaysia since independence from Britain in 1957 but was ousted in...

Malaysia’s king has chosen a new prime minister on August 20 in accordance with nominations of lawmakers, naming the former deputy prime minister under the previous administration, Ismail Sabri Yaakob, the country’s new leader.

The choice from a number of potential candidates has been widely expected. Ismail’s appointment marks the return of the United Malaysia National Organisation, or UMNO, which lost the 2018 general elections, to the country’s premiership. Ismail is a core member of the party and his nomination essentially restores the rule of UMNO, which had led Malaysia since independence from Britain in 1957 but was ousted in 2018 elections over a multibillion-dollar financial scandal.

Ismail had secured the backing of 114 lawmakers for a slender majority. He will be sworn in as Malaysia’s ninth prime minister on August 21.

The 114 votes exceed the 111 needed for a simple majority but are close to the backing the previous prime minister Muhyiddin Yassin had and was unable to preserve.

Not all are happy with the choice

However, Malaysians unsatisfied with the choice have launched an online petition to protest Ismail’s nomination, with more than 340,000 signatures collected so far. Many believe Ismail’s choice will restore the status quo, with its perceived as failed response to a worsening Covid-19 pandemic, among other shortcomings.

A lawyer before he joined politics, Ismail held several ministerial posts in previous UMNO governments. In 2015 as trade minister, Ismail caused controversy when he urged ethnic Malay consumers to boycott profiteering Chinese businesses. He was also slammed for supporting the vaping industry, which is dominated by Malays, despite warnings from the health ministry.

Political programme for Malays

In 2018 polls, Ismail waved the racial card, warning that every vote for the opposition was akin to eliminating special privileges given to Malays under a decades-old affirmative action program.

Ismail was named defense minister when Muhyiddin took power in March 202, and became the government’s public face through daily briefings on security issues related to the pandemic. He was promoted to deputy prime minister in July as Muhyiddin sought to woo support from UMNO, which was unhappy at playing second fiddle to Muhyiddin’s smaller party.



Support ASEAN news

Investvine has been a consistent voice in ASEAN news for more than a decade. From breaking news to exclusive interviews with key ASEAN leaders, we have brought you factual and engaging reports – the stories that matter, free of charge.

Like many news organisations, we are striving to survive in an age of reduced advertising and biased journalism. Our mission is to rise above today’s challenges and chart tomorrow’s world with clear, dependable reporting.

Support us now with a donation of your choosing. Your contribution will help us shine a light on important ASEAN stories, reach more people and lift the manifold voices of this dynamic, influential region.

$
Personal Info

Donation Total: $10.00

 

 

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