Mandalay to become “logistics hub” for China, India

Mandalay_-1
A street scene from Mandalay

Chinese businessmen in Mandalay, often found cradling a cup of tea on a restaurant veranda during hot afternoons, have been doing so for years. The northern capital has been an easily accessible entry point for China, and now, with momentum built atop the country’s economic reforms, India could converge on this crossroad as well.

Mandalay is being molded to become a logistics hub that will connect the world’s two most populous nations with the rapidly developing economies of ASEAN, as well as Europe via access to the Bay of Bengal.

Myanmar state media announced on July 18 that it would be accepting bids from investors to transform the Mandalay International Airport into a “logistics hub,” adding the required structural capacity to transport goods from China and India onward.

The winner of the contract, which comes just weeks after a highly coveted telecom license was issued to Qatar’s Ooredoo, will be announced by the end of July, China’s Xinhua news agency cited the New Light of Myanmar as saying.

The airport will begin its upgrades in September, estimated at more than $100 million.

Mandalya is connected to Naypyidaw, the country’s secluded capital, and Yangon by a major cross-country expressway.

The city’s airport lies near smack dab in the middle of the country, and is accessible by every part by three-hour flights.

Myanmar currently has seven local airlines in operation, and is served by 22 other international airlines.



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[caption id="attachment_12695" align="alignleft" width="300"] A street scene from Mandalay[/caption] Chinese businessmen in Mandalay, often found cradling a cup of tea on a restaurant veranda during hot afternoons, have been doing so for years. The northern capital has been an easily accessible entry point for China, and now, with momentum built atop the country’s economic reforms, India could converge on this crossroad as well. Mandalay is being molded to become a logistics hub that will connect the world’s two most populous nations with the rapidly developing economies of ASEAN, as well as Europe via access to the Bay of Bengal. Myanmar...

Mandalay_-1
A street scene from Mandalay

Chinese businessmen in Mandalay, often found cradling a cup of tea on a restaurant veranda during hot afternoons, have been doing so for years. The northern capital has been an easily accessible entry point for China, and now, with momentum built atop the country’s economic reforms, India could converge on this crossroad as well.

Mandalay is being molded to become a logistics hub that will connect the world’s two most populous nations with the rapidly developing economies of ASEAN, as well as Europe via access to the Bay of Bengal.

Myanmar state media announced on July 18 that it would be accepting bids from investors to transform the Mandalay International Airport into a “logistics hub,” adding the required structural capacity to transport goods from China and India onward.

The winner of the contract, which comes just weeks after a highly coveted telecom license was issued to Qatar’s Ooredoo, will be announced by the end of July, China’s Xinhua news agency cited the New Light of Myanmar as saying.

The airport will begin its upgrades in September, estimated at more than $100 million.

Mandalya is connected to Naypyidaw, the country’s secluded capital, and Yangon by a major cross-country expressway.

The city’s airport lies near smack dab in the middle of the country, and is accessible by every part by three-hour flights.

Myanmar currently has seven local airlines in operation, and is served by 22 other international airlines.



Support ASEAN news

Investvine has been a consistent voice in ASEAN news for more than a decade. From breaking news to exclusive interviews with key ASEAN leaders, we have brought you factual and engaging reports – the stories that matter, free of charge.

Like many news organisations, we are striving to survive in an age of reduced advertising and biased journalism. Our mission is to rise above today’s challenges and chart tomorrow’s world with clear, dependable reporting.

Support us now with a donation of your choosing. Your contribution will help us shine a light on important ASEAN stories, reach more people and lift the manifold voices of this dynamic, influential region.

$
Personal Info

Donation Total: $10.00