Myanmar’s ruling party claims victory in elections

Picture: Myanmar Times

Myanmar’s ruling party National League for Democracy (NLD) said on November 9 that it had won enough seats in parliament to form the next government. The claim comes after an unofficial count of votes from the country’s second general election since the end of strict military rule, Reuters reported.

According to party spokesman Myo Nyunt, the NLD, which is led by state counselor and former democracy icon Aung San Suu Kyi, had won the 322 seats in parliament needed, though no official results had been announced by the election commission yet.

The election, held on November 8, was seen as a referendum on the fledgling democratic government led by Suu Kyi and the NLD, which remains hugely popular at home but has seen its reputation collapse overseas amid allegations of genocide against the Rohingya Muslim minority.

Up for grabs in the election are 315 seats in the 425-member lower house and 161 seats in the 217-seat upper house of parliament.

Not everyone could cast their ballot

In contrast to the wave of optimism that greeted the NLD’s landslide win in 2015, Myanmar went into this election under a cloud of a surging Covid-19 outbreak, economic hardship and escalating ethnic conflicts.

However, although Myanmar is seeing an average of 1,100 new coronavirus cases a day, fears of the virus appeared not to dampen Sunday’s turnout among the 37 million registered voters.

But more than a million people across the country were unable to vote after polls were cancelled due to insurgencies mostly in the northeast. Hundreds of thousands of Rohingya, people confined to camps and villages in Myanmar’s Rakhine State and most without citizenship, were also unable to vote.

The election commission has said the polls in areas affected by conflict had to be cancelled for safety reasons and that only citizens were entitled to vote.



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Picture: Myanmar Times Myanmar's ruling party National League for Democracy (NLD) said on November 9 that it had won enough seats in parliament to form the next government. The claim comes after an unofficial count of votes from the country’s second general election since the end of strict military rule, Reuters reported. According to party spokesman Myo Nyunt, the NLD, which is led by state counselor and former democracy icon Aung San Suu Kyi, had won the 322 seats in parliament needed, though no official results had been announced by the election commission yet. The election, held on November 8,...

Picture: Myanmar Times

Myanmar’s ruling party National League for Democracy (NLD) said on November 9 that it had won enough seats in parliament to form the next government. The claim comes after an unofficial count of votes from the country’s second general election since the end of strict military rule, Reuters reported.

According to party spokesman Myo Nyunt, the NLD, which is led by state counselor and former democracy icon Aung San Suu Kyi, had won the 322 seats in parliament needed, though no official results had been announced by the election commission yet.

The election, held on November 8, was seen as a referendum on the fledgling democratic government led by Suu Kyi and the NLD, which remains hugely popular at home but has seen its reputation collapse overseas amid allegations of genocide against the Rohingya Muslim minority.

Up for grabs in the election are 315 seats in the 425-member lower house and 161 seats in the 217-seat upper house of parliament.

Not everyone could cast their ballot

In contrast to the wave of optimism that greeted the NLD’s landslide win in 2015, Myanmar went into this election under a cloud of a surging Covid-19 outbreak, economic hardship and escalating ethnic conflicts.

However, although Myanmar is seeing an average of 1,100 new coronavirus cases a day, fears of the virus appeared not to dampen Sunday’s turnout among the 37 million registered voters.

But more than a million people across the country were unable to vote after polls were cancelled due to insurgencies mostly in the northeast. Hundreds of thousands of Rohingya, people confined to camps and villages in Myanmar’s Rakhine State and most without citizenship, were also unable to vote.

The election commission has said the polls in areas affected by conflict had to be cancelled for safety reasons and that only citizens were entitled to vote.



Support ASEAN news

Investvine has been a consistent voice in ASEAN news for more than a decade. From breaking news to exclusive interviews with key ASEAN leaders, we have brought you factual and engaging reports – the stories that matter, free of charge.

Like many news organisations, we are striving to survive in an age of reduced advertising and biased journalism. Our mission is to rise above today’s challenges and chart tomorrow’s world with clear, dependable reporting.

Support us now with a donation of your choosing. Your contribution will help us shine a light on important ASEAN stories, reach more people and lift the manifold voices of this dynamic, influential region.

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Personal Info

Donation Total: $10.00

 

 

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