Philippines formulates law for contactless greeting amid Covid-19 pandemic

Philippine house lawmakers have passed a bill to legislate a new form of contactless greeting as Covid-19 infections spike in the country.

According to the bill approved by the House of Representatives, the new gesture will involve “gracefully laying the palm of the right hand over the center of one’s chest while simultaneously lowering the head, with eyes either closed or cast down.”

The new way of greeting, called “Bating Filipino,” will replace the traditional handshake which seen as a risk to public health in teh current situation.

According to Bayani Fernando, a lawmaker representing the Nationalist People’s Coalition party who proposed the bill, countries across the world have looked for new forms of greeting, from elbow bumps to foot shakes, in an effort to reduce transmission of the coronavirus. In France, health minister Olivier Véran told people to avoid hugs and kisses, while Italians were advised to be “a bit less expansive” when greeting one another.

In Thailand, which has managed to keep case numbers below 13,000, some have speculated that the greeting form of the wai – where the palms are pressed together in a prayer-like gesture and people do not establish body contact – might have contributed to the country’s success in reducing local transmissions.

“Bating” greeting bill still need approval by the senate

The new bill now needs to be passed by the senate and signed by the president before it is passed into law. It doesn’t specify any punishment for people who do not adopt the greeting.

As of January 21, the Philippines counted over 510,000 Covid-19 infections, of which around 468,000 recovered and 10.136 died.

The country announced plans to buy 20 million doses of the Moderna vaccine this week, adding to its supply of 72 million doses from AstraZeneca, Novavax and Sinovac.



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Philippine house lawmakers have passed a bill to legislate a new form of contactless greeting as Covid-19 infections spike in the country. According to the bill approved by the House of Representatives, the new gesture will involve “gracefully laying the palm of the right hand over the center of one’s chest while simultaneously lowering the head, with eyes either closed or cast down.” The new way of greeting, called “Bating Filipino,” will replace the traditional handshake which seen as a risk to public health in teh current situation. According to Bayani Fernando, a lawmaker representing the Nationalist People's Coalition party...

Philippine house lawmakers have passed a bill to legislate a new form of contactless greeting as Covid-19 infections spike in the country.

According to the bill approved by the House of Representatives, the new gesture will involve “gracefully laying the palm of the right hand over the center of one’s chest while simultaneously lowering the head, with eyes either closed or cast down.”

The new way of greeting, called “Bating Filipino,” will replace the traditional handshake which seen as a risk to public health in teh current situation.

According to Bayani Fernando, a lawmaker representing the Nationalist People’s Coalition party who proposed the bill, countries across the world have looked for new forms of greeting, from elbow bumps to foot shakes, in an effort to reduce transmission of the coronavirus. In France, health minister Olivier Véran told people to avoid hugs and kisses, while Italians were advised to be “a bit less expansive” when greeting one another.

In Thailand, which has managed to keep case numbers below 13,000, some have speculated that the greeting form of the wai – where the palms are pressed together in a prayer-like gesture and people do not establish body contact – might have contributed to the country’s success in reducing local transmissions.

“Bating” greeting bill still need approval by the senate

The new bill now needs to be passed by the senate and signed by the president before it is passed into law. It doesn’t specify any punishment for people who do not adopt the greeting.

As of January 21, the Philippines counted over 510,000 Covid-19 infections, of which around 468,000 recovered and 10.136 died.

The country announced plans to buy 20 million doses of the Moderna vaccine this week, adding to its supply of 72 million doses from AstraZeneca, Novavax and Sinovac.



Support ASEAN news

Investvine has been a consistent voice in ASEAN news for more than a decade. From breaking news to exclusive interviews with key ASEAN leaders, we have brought you factual and engaging reports – the stories that matter, free of charge.

Like many news organisations, we are striving to survive in an age of reduced advertising and biased journalism. Our mission is to rise above today’s challenges and chart tomorrow’s world with clear, dependable reporting.

Support us now with a donation of your choosing. Your contribution will help us shine a light on important ASEAN stories, reach more people and lift the manifold voices of this dynamic, influential region.

$
Personal Info

Donation Total: $10.00

 

 

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