Philippines next to ease tough lockdown

Philippine President Rodrigo Duterte ordered one of longest and toughest coronavirus lockdowns in the world to be gradually eased starting from June 1, even tough the country seeing daily spikes in new infections.

Most businesses, workplaces and shops will be allowed to reopen, and transport including train and bus rides and local flights will resume.

Metro Manila and three surrounding regions will be placed under a so-called “general community quarantine.” Under this scheme, strict stay-at-home orders are lifted, except for the young and the elderly.

Metro Manila will also allow gatherings of up to ten people, free movement in and out of the city as long as people wear masks and keep their distance. The rest of the country will be placed under a “modified general community quarantine,” which is a transition phase to looser regulations.

Businesses not overly optimistic about immediate prospects

A 1.3 trillion-peso ($25.7 billion-) stimulus is being crafted to help the country bounce back, but nearly a third of Philippine businesses are not overly optimistic of their prospects even after lockdowns are lifted, asking for assistance which includes deferring loan payments, according to a National Economic and Development Authority survey published last week.

The Philippines reported 539 infections on May 28, its highest daily tally, bringing its total to 15,588 cases, with 921 deaths.

The country was among the first in Southeast Asia to shut down large swathes of its economy and the restrictions on movement in the capital have battered its economy exceptionally hard. Analysts say it will lead to the country’s deepest contraction in more than three decades.

Metro Manila’s lockdown by the end of May will surpass the 76-day quarantine of Wuhan, the city in China where the first outbreak of the coronavirus was detected. Manila’s restrictions have hit the livelihoods of millions of workers and their families.

Philippine President Rodrigo Duterte ordered one of longest and toughest coronavirus lockdowns in the world to be gradually eased starting from June 1, even tough the country seeing daily spikes in new infections. Most businesses, workplaces and shops will be allowed to reopen, and transport including train and bus rides and local flights will resume. Metro Manila and three surrounding regions will be placed under a so-called “general community quarantine.” Under this scheme, strict stay-at-home orders are lifted, except for the young and the elderly. Metro Manila will also allow gatherings of up to ten people, free movement in and...

Philippine President Rodrigo Duterte ordered one of longest and toughest coronavirus lockdowns in the world to be gradually eased starting from June 1, even tough the country seeing daily spikes in new infections.

Most businesses, workplaces and shops will be allowed to reopen, and transport including train and bus rides and local flights will resume.

Metro Manila and three surrounding regions will be placed under a so-called “general community quarantine.” Under this scheme, strict stay-at-home orders are lifted, except for the young and the elderly.

Metro Manila will also allow gatherings of up to ten people, free movement in and out of the city as long as people wear masks and keep their distance. The rest of the country will be placed under a “modified general community quarantine,” which is a transition phase to looser regulations.

Businesses not overly optimistic about immediate prospects

A 1.3 trillion-peso ($25.7 billion-) stimulus is being crafted to help the country bounce back, but nearly a third of Philippine businesses are not overly optimistic of their prospects even after lockdowns are lifted, asking for assistance which includes deferring loan payments, according to a National Economic and Development Authority survey published last week.

The Philippines reported 539 infections on May 28, its highest daily tally, bringing its total to 15,588 cases, with 921 deaths.

The country was among the first in Southeast Asia to shut down large swathes of its economy and the restrictions on movement in the capital have battered its economy exceptionally hard. Analysts say it will lead to the country’s deepest contraction in more than three decades.

Metro Manila’s lockdown by the end of May will surpass the 76-day quarantine of Wuhan, the city in China where the first outbreak of the coronavirus was detected. Manila’s restrictions have hit the livelihoods of millions of workers and their families.

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