Philippines: Post-typhoon rebuilding will cost $5.8b

Phil typhoonThe cost of rebuilding homes, facilities and infrastructure in the areas where typhoon Haiyan struck in the Philippines will cost up to $5.8 billion, Arsenio Balisacan, the Philippine economic planning secretary, has said according to Reuters.

The storm has left almost 4,000 people dead and 4 million displaced.

The United Nations Development Programme has pledged $5 million to help clear away debris that is hampering relief efforts. But Helen Clark, the programme’s administrator, said four times that would be needed to clear rubble in affected provinces in the first phase of work.

The government said nearly 25,000 personnel, 104 ships and boats and 163 aircraft from various countries had been deployed. Almost 90 medical teams, roughly half foreign and half local, are at work.

Filipino firemen and emergency workers have spent the past few days in the aftermath of Typhoon Haiyan filling hastily dug trenches with hundreds of decomposing bodies.

But aid workers say mass graves can complicate the recovery effort by hindering identification and making it difficult for devastated families to locate possible survivors and grieve.

Mass burials began after officials became overwhelmed with hundreds of bodies — many of them unidentified — piling up near places like Tacloban city hall, triggering fears among some that the corpses could spread diseases.



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The cost of rebuilding homes, facilities and infrastructure in the areas where typhoon Haiyan struck in the Philippines will cost up to $5.8 billion, Arsenio Balisacan, the Philippine economic planning secretary, has said according to Reuters. The storm has left almost 4,000 people dead and 4 million displaced. The United Nations Development Programme has pledged $5 million to help clear away debris that is hampering relief efforts. But Helen Clark, the programme's administrator, said four times that would be needed to clear rubble in affected provinces in the first phase of work. The government said nearly 25,000 personnel, 104 ships...

Phil typhoonThe cost of rebuilding homes, facilities and infrastructure in the areas where typhoon Haiyan struck in the Philippines will cost up to $5.8 billion, Arsenio Balisacan, the Philippine economic planning secretary, has said according to Reuters.

The storm has left almost 4,000 people dead and 4 million displaced.

The United Nations Development Programme has pledged $5 million to help clear away debris that is hampering relief efforts. But Helen Clark, the programme’s administrator, said four times that would be needed to clear rubble in affected provinces in the first phase of work.

The government said nearly 25,000 personnel, 104 ships and boats and 163 aircraft from various countries had been deployed. Almost 90 medical teams, roughly half foreign and half local, are at work.

Filipino firemen and emergency workers have spent the past few days in the aftermath of Typhoon Haiyan filling hastily dug trenches with hundreds of decomposing bodies.

But aid workers say mass graves can complicate the recovery effort by hindering identification and making it difficult for devastated families to locate possible survivors and grieve.

Mass burials began after officials became overwhelmed with hundreds of bodies — many of them unidentified — piling up near places like Tacloban city hall, triggering fears among some that the corpses could spread diseases.



Support ASEAN news

Investvine has been a consistent voice in ASEAN news for more than a decade. From breaking news to exclusive interviews with key ASEAN leaders, we have brought you factual and engaging reports – the stories that matter, free of charge.

Like many news organisations, we are striving to survive in an age of reduced advertising and biased journalism. Our mission is to rise above today’s challenges and chart tomorrow’s world with clear, dependable reporting.

Support us now with a donation of your choosing. Your contribution will help us shine a light on important ASEAN stories, reach more people and lift the manifold voices of this dynamic, influential region.

$
Personal Info

Donation Total: $10.00

 

 

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