Rebel group signs ceasefire agreement with Myanmar government

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ABSDFOver the weekend, the All Burma Students’ Democratic Front (ABSDF) agreed to a 12-point cease-fire plan with the government of Myanmar. This is by far the most fruitful development to come from last week’s commemoration of the 25th anniversary of the 1988 pro-democracy uprising.

The ABSDF was formed in the aftermath of the 8888 Uprising, so called because it began on 8 August 1988, which led to the massacre of thousands of Burmese citizens by the military. The ABSDF was a group of students who formed a militia and fought the Burmese government alongside ethnic minority groups and other rebel organizations. The ABSDF leadership has been living in exile for 25 years, but a presence has remained in Myanmar and has engaged in armed clashes with the military repeatedly over the years.

Representatives of the ABSDF and the government held a joint press conference at the end of the weekend, where they announced the following 12-point agreement:

1. To make efforts to ensure a nationwide cease-fire with accountability and responsibility on both sides;

2. To form an independent monitoring team responsible for ceasefires and local peace-making processes;

3. To officially invite diverse political forces, political parties, organizations, and persons for their inclusion in the country’s political processes;

4. To carry out continued discussions for the release of all remaining political prisoners;

5. To continue holding discussions on democratic affairs, national equality, and autonomy that have been proposed by the ABSDF;

6. To have rights to independently hold discussions and meetings on the results of ABSDF’s political talks, political stands, and processes with the public in accord with the laws;

7. To hold continued discussion on the removal of ABSDF from the “unlawful associations” list;

8. To hold continued discussions on the removal of ABSDF members from the government’s blacklist and the cancelation of charges against its members, in accordance with the law;

9. To have rights to liaise with local and foreign NGOs and CBOs in accordance with existing laws;

10. To have rights to engage with news agencies and media freely and independently;

11. To continue discussions on opening liaison offices in Kaly, Payathonsu, Muse and Loikaw which have been suggested by ABSDF for the smooth operation of communications channels including local peace-making processes and ceasefires;

12. To agree to a Code of Conduct which is to be observed by both armies (ABSDF and government);

The two sides also agreed to hold a second round of talks this November.



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Over the weekend, the All Burma Students’ Democratic Front (ABSDF) agreed to a 12-point cease-fire plan with the government of Myanmar. This is by far the most fruitful development to come from last week’s commemoration of the 25th anniversary of the 1988 pro-democracy uprising. The ABSDF was formed in the aftermath of the 8888 Uprising, so called because it began on 8 August 1988, which led to the massacre of thousands of Burmese citizens by the military. The ABSDF was a group of students who formed a militia and fought the Burmese government alongside ethnic minority groups and other rebel...

ABSDFOver the weekend, the All Burma Students’ Democratic Front (ABSDF) agreed to a 12-point cease-fire plan with the government of Myanmar. This is by far the most fruitful development to come from last week’s commemoration of the 25th anniversary of the 1988 pro-democracy uprising.

The ABSDF was formed in the aftermath of the 8888 Uprising, so called because it began on 8 August 1988, which led to the massacre of thousands of Burmese citizens by the military. The ABSDF was a group of students who formed a militia and fought the Burmese government alongside ethnic minority groups and other rebel organizations. The ABSDF leadership has been living in exile for 25 years, but a presence has remained in Myanmar and has engaged in armed clashes with the military repeatedly over the years.

Representatives of the ABSDF and the government held a joint press conference at the end of the weekend, where they announced the following 12-point agreement:

1. To make efforts to ensure a nationwide cease-fire with accountability and responsibility on both sides;

2. To form an independent monitoring team responsible for ceasefires and local peace-making processes;

3. To officially invite diverse political forces, political parties, organizations, and persons for their inclusion in the country’s political processes;

4. To carry out continued discussions for the release of all remaining political prisoners;

5. To continue holding discussions on democratic affairs, national equality, and autonomy that have been proposed by the ABSDF;

6. To have rights to independently hold discussions and meetings on the results of ABSDF’s political talks, political stands, and processes with the public in accord with the laws;

7. To hold continued discussion on the removal of ABSDF from the “unlawful associations” list;

8. To hold continued discussions on the removal of ABSDF members from the government’s blacklist and the cancelation of charges against its members, in accordance with the law;

9. To have rights to liaise with local and foreign NGOs and CBOs in accordance with existing laws;

10. To have rights to engage with news agencies and media freely and independently;

11. To continue discussions on opening liaison offices in Kaly, Payathonsu, Muse and Loikaw which have been suggested by ABSDF for the smooth operation of communications channels including local peace-making processes and ceasefires;

12. To agree to a Code of Conduct which is to be observed by both armies (ABSDF and government);

The two sides also agreed to hold a second round of talks this November.



Support ASEAN news

Investvine has been a consistent voice in ASEAN news for more than a decade. From breaking news to exclusive interviews with key ASEAN leaders, we have brought you factual and engaging reports – the stories that matter, free of charge.

Like many news organisations, we are striving to survive in an age of reduced advertising and biased journalism. Our mission is to rise above today’s challenges and chart tomorrow’s world with clear, dependable reporting.

Support us now with a donation of your choosing. Your contribution will help us shine a light on important ASEAN stories, reach more people and lift the manifold voices of this dynamic, influential region.

$
Personal Info

Donation Total: $10.00

 

 

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