Remembering the salad towers of Pizza Hut China

Salad tower1
Click to enlarge

You visit Pizza Hut in China; you just paid 28 renminbi ($4.57) for full access to their salad bar, you are limited to one helping but you want to stretch your dollar farther because you’re starving. What do you do?

You build a tower, a giant salad tower.

And that’s what the prudent patrons of China’s Pizza Hut had been doing ever since it was first documented in 2006 when a user on YouTube uploaded footage of the salad stacking in action.

A strong foundation usually starts by placing small vegetables like peas and corn in the middle, while arranging baby carrots and cucumber slices on the edges of your plate to reinforce balance and structural integrity. And as soon as you were finished, you add the aesthetic touch of orange slices or Thousand Island dressing to top off your crowning achievement.

Back in 2009 The Beijinger reported that Pizza Hut officially announced that it would be removing salad bars from 440 of its locations in China as part of a menu revamp, and that it was because of the losses that incurred from these “salad towers”. As soon as word caught wind about the salad bar removals, more customers felt encouraged to build their final masterpieces of vegetable architecture. Others agreed that Pizza Hut’s decision was of good reason, and that these structures were overall wasteful because many people didn’t even finish eating them.

Beijing-based writer Eric Jou, a contributor on the video-game focused blog Kotaku, claims that there are still salad bars in his area. But he unfortunately reports that the salad tower construction has possibly come to an end.

Pictures of the mighty salad towers can viewed here.



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[caption id="attachment_12997" align="alignleft" width="300"] Click to enlarge[/caption] You visit Pizza Hut in China; you just paid 28 renminbi ($4.57) for full access to their salad bar, you are limited to one helping but you want to stretch your dollar farther because you’re starving. What do you do? You build a tower, a giant salad tower. And that’s what the prudent patrons of China’s Pizza Hut had been doing ever since it was first documented in 2006 when a user on YouTube uploaded footage of the salad stacking in action. A strong foundation usually starts by placing small vegetables like peas...

Salad tower1
Click to enlarge

You visit Pizza Hut in China; you just paid 28 renminbi ($4.57) for full access to their salad bar, you are limited to one helping but you want to stretch your dollar farther because you’re starving. What do you do?

You build a tower, a giant salad tower.

And that’s what the prudent patrons of China’s Pizza Hut had been doing ever since it was first documented in 2006 when a user on YouTube uploaded footage of the salad stacking in action.

A strong foundation usually starts by placing small vegetables like peas and corn in the middle, while arranging baby carrots and cucumber slices on the edges of your plate to reinforce balance and structural integrity. And as soon as you were finished, you add the aesthetic touch of orange slices or Thousand Island dressing to top off your crowning achievement.

Back in 2009 The Beijinger reported that Pizza Hut officially announced that it would be removing salad bars from 440 of its locations in China as part of a menu revamp, and that it was because of the losses that incurred from these “salad towers”. As soon as word caught wind about the salad bar removals, more customers felt encouraged to build their final masterpieces of vegetable architecture. Others agreed that Pizza Hut’s decision was of good reason, and that these structures were overall wasteful because many people didn’t even finish eating them.

Beijing-based writer Eric Jou, a contributor on the video-game focused blog Kotaku, claims that there are still salad bars in his area. But he unfortunately reports that the salad tower construction has possibly come to an end.

Pictures of the mighty salad towers can viewed here.



Support ASEAN news

Investvine has been a consistent voice in ASEAN news for more than a decade. From breaking news to exclusive interviews with key ASEAN leaders, we have brought you factual and engaging reports – the stories that matter, free of charge.

Like many news organisations, we are striving to survive in an age of reduced advertising and biased journalism. Our mission is to rise above today’s challenges and chart tomorrow’s world with clear, dependable reporting.

Support us now with a donation of your choosing. Your contribution will help us shine a light on important ASEAN stories, reach more people and lift the manifold voices of this dynamic, influential region.

$
Personal Info

Donation Total: $10.00

 

 

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