Singapore plans to import green energy to reach low-carbon goals

Singapore plans to transform its energy consumption towards low-carbon electricity by 2035 and import up to four gigawatts of green power, the equivalent of about 30 per cent of Singapore’s expected electricity demand in that year.

In a media release on October 25, the city-state’s Energy Market Authority announced that it intends to issue two requests for proposal for up to a total of four gigawatts of low-carbon electricity imports.

“Proposals for electricity imported from coal-fired generation sources will not be accepted,” the authority added.

The requests for proposals for electricity imports would allow Singapore to further its efforts in developing regional power grids and supporting regional decarbonisation, while supporting climate action and diversifying energy sources, it noted.

Various energy sources to remain

Besides the low-carbon electricity imports, the remaining electricity supply will continue to come from various sources, ranging from the current natural gas-fired power plants to solar and waste-to-energy sources.

Singapore’s minister for trade and industry Gan Kim Yong said that importing low-carbon energy would be a “key needle mover” in Singapore’s energy transition in the near- to medium-term.

Solar energy alone cannot generate enough power

While the country is pushing the boundaries to reduce its carbon footprint by enhancing energy efficiency and harvesting solar energy, he said these efforts alone were “not sufficient.”

“Increasing the energy efficiency of our natural gas power plants can, at best, reduce carbon emissions by about ten per cent,” he said.

“Even if we maximise all available space in Singapore for solar deployment, and accounting for efficiency improvements, we will still not be able to generate enough power to keep the lights on with solar energy alone,” the minister said, adding that the import of green energy was inevitable.



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Singapore plans to transform its energy consumption towards low-carbon electricity by 2035 and import up to four gigawatts of green power, the equivalent of about 30 per cent of Singapore’s expected electricity demand in that year. In a media release on October 25, the city-state’s Energy Market Authority announced that it intends to issue two requests for proposal for up to a total of four gigawatts of low-carbon electricity imports. “Proposals for electricity imported from coal-fired generation sources will not be accepted,” the authority added. The requests for proposals for electricity imports would allow Singapore to further its efforts in...

Singapore plans to transform its energy consumption towards low-carbon electricity by 2035 and import up to four gigawatts of green power, the equivalent of about 30 per cent of Singapore’s expected electricity demand in that year.

In a media release on October 25, the city-state’s Energy Market Authority announced that it intends to issue two requests for proposal for up to a total of four gigawatts of low-carbon electricity imports.

“Proposals for electricity imported from coal-fired generation sources will not be accepted,” the authority added.

The requests for proposals for electricity imports would allow Singapore to further its efforts in developing regional power grids and supporting regional decarbonisation, while supporting climate action and diversifying energy sources, it noted.

Various energy sources to remain

Besides the low-carbon electricity imports, the remaining electricity supply will continue to come from various sources, ranging from the current natural gas-fired power plants to solar and waste-to-energy sources.

Singapore’s minister for trade and industry Gan Kim Yong said that importing low-carbon energy would be a “key needle mover” in Singapore’s energy transition in the near- to medium-term.

Solar energy alone cannot generate enough power

While the country is pushing the boundaries to reduce its carbon footprint by enhancing energy efficiency and harvesting solar energy, he said these efforts alone were “not sufficient.”

“Increasing the energy efficiency of our natural gas power plants can, at best, reduce carbon emissions by about ten per cent,” he said.

“Even if we maximise all available space in Singapore for solar deployment, and accounting for efficiency improvements, we will still not be able to generate enough power to keep the lights on with solar energy alone,” the minister said, adding that the import of green energy was inevitable.



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Investvine has been a consistent voice in ASEAN news for more than a decade. From breaking news to exclusive interviews with key ASEAN leaders, we have brought you factual and engaging reports – the stories that matter, free of charge.

Like many news organisations, we are striving to survive in an age of reduced advertising and biased journalism. Our mission is to rise above today’s challenges and chart tomorrow’s world with clear, dependable reporting.

Support us now with a donation of your choosing. Your contribution will help us shine a light on important ASEAN stories, reach more people and lift the manifold voices of this dynamic, influential region.

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