Singapore workers ‘unhappiest’ in Asia, says survey

Singapore workersWorkers in Singapore are the unhappiest in Asia and nearly two-thirds would like to quit their jobs in the next year, a regional survey by recruiting firm Randstad Group showed, the South China Morning Post reported.

Singapore may be a banking and trade center with world-class amenities and high per capita income, but it has seen unprecedented public discontent over the rising cost of living and competition from foreign workers. Randstad’s World of Work Report showed 23 per cent of Singaporean workers felt unmotivated and that their skills were not being used effectively, while 64 per cent planned to leave their jobs in the next 12 months.

The top reasons were an unsuitable corporate culture, difficult bosses and being asked to do more with less. Hong Kong workers were second only to Singapore in terms of their lack of motivation (22 per cent). Indian workers were the happiest in Asia, with about 70 per cent feeling challenged, motivated and mentored, said the survey of 14,000 employers and professionals in Singapore, Malaysia, Hong Kong, mainland China, India, Japan, Australia and New Zealand.

Singapore’s government, its popular vote hit in elections by the public anger, has sought to rein in living costs and tighten the labour market for foreigners. The steps include raising the minimum salary for foreigners seeking an employment pass to 3,300 Singapore dollars ($2,754) per month and obliging employers to advertise job vacancies to Singaporeans for 14 days before an overseas worker can be hired.



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Workers in Singapore are the unhappiest in Asia and nearly two-thirds would like to quit their jobs in the next year, a regional survey by recruiting firm Randstad Group showed, the South China Morning Post reported. Singapore may be a banking and trade center with world-class amenities and high per capita income, but it has seen unprecedented public discontent over the rising cost of living and competition from foreign workers. Randstad's World of Work Report showed 23 per cent of Singaporean workers felt unmotivated and that their skills were not being used effectively, while 64 per cent planned to leave...

Singapore workersWorkers in Singapore are the unhappiest in Asia and nearly two-thirds would like to quit their jobs in the next year, a regional survey by recruiting firm Randstad Group showed, the South China Morning Post reported.

Singapore may be a banking and trade center with world-class amenities and high per capita income, but it has seen unprecedented public discontent over the rising cost of living and competition from foreign workers. Randstad’s World of Work Report showed 23 per cent of Singaporean workers felt unmotivated and that their skills were not being used effectively, while 64 per cent planned to leave their jobs in the next 12 months.

The top reasons were an unsuitable corporate culture, difficult bosses and being asked to do more with less. Hong Kong workers were second only to Singapore in terms of their lack of motivation (22 per cent). Indian workers were the happiest in Asia, with about 70 per cent feeling challenged, motivated and mentored, said the survey of 14,000 employers and professionals in Singapore, Malaysia, Hong Kong, mainland China, India, Japan, Australia and New Zealand.

Singapore’s government, its popular vote hit in elections by the public anger, has sought to rein in living costs and tighten the labour market for foreigners. The steps include raising the minimum salary for foreigners seeking an employment pass to 3,300 Singapore dollars ($2,754) per month and obliging employers to advertise job vacancies to Singaporeans for 14 days before an overseas worker can be hired.



Support ASEAN news

Investvine has been a consistent voice in ASEAN news for more than a decade. From breaking news to exclusive interviews with key ASEAN leaders, we have brought you factual and engaging reports – the stories that matter, free of charge.

Like many news organisations, we are striving to survive in an age of reduced advertising and biased journalism. Our mission is to rise above today’s challenges and chart tomorrow’s world with clear, dependable reporting.

Support us now with a donation of your choosing. Your contribution will help us shine a light on important ASEAN stories, reach more people and lift the manifold voices of this dynamic, influential region.

$
Personal Info

Donation Total: $10.00

 

 

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