Test for San Suu Kyi government on November 8

Aung San Suu Kyi during her visit to the Czech Republic in early June

November 8 will be the fateful day for former democracy icon turned pariah Aung San Suu Kyi, Myanmar’s de-facto leader who has disappointed global observers in how she apparently gave up her former ideals and seemed no to bother much about it..

Myanmar’s election commission on July 1 announced that the next general election will be held on November 8. In a statement, Hla Thein, chairman of the union election commission, said a “multi-party general election for the parliament” would be held on that day.

Analysts see the polls as an important test of Myanmar’s transition away from direct military rule. It is the first election under a civilian government in six decades.

Aung San Suu Kyi, a Nobel laureate, won power in a landslide in 2015 that ended decades of military rule. But her administration has come under pressure internationally over a military crackdown that drove hundreds of thousands of Rohingya into Bangladesh in 2017.

She personally appeared at an international tribunal in The Hague to defend the army against the allegations of rape, arson and mass killing in the campaign, which rights groups have said was tantamount to genocide.

Suu Kyi remains popular at home

But at home, Aung San Suu Kyi remains overwhelmingly popular, although her government has struggled to match sky-high expectations and has had to rebut criticism over escalating fighting with ethnic armed groups and slower-than-expected economic growth.

The army continues to wield enormous power under the constitution, which guarantees its control over key ministries, and 25 per cent of seats in parliament.

Myanmar currently has 94 registered political parties. They will vie for a total of 1,171 seats that are up for grabs in both houses of the union parliament and in the state and regional legislatures.

President U Win Myint and state counselor Daw Aung San Suu Kyi, both of the ruling National League for Democracy, will also contest the nationwide poll. Over 37 million people in Myanmar will be eligible to vote.

Aung San Suu Kyi during her visit to the Czech Republic in early June November 8 will be the fateful day for former democracy icon turned pariah Aung San Suu Kyi, Myanmar’s de-facto leader who has disappointed global observers in how she apparently gave up her former ideals and seemed no to bother much about it.. Myanmar’s election commission on July 1 announced that the next general election will be held on November 8. In a statement, Hla Thein, chairman of the union election commission, said a "multi-party general election for the parliament" would be held on that day. Analysts...

Aung San Suu Kyi during her visit to the Czech Republic in early June

November 8 will be the fateful day for former democracy icon turned pariah Aung San Suu Kyi, Myanmar’s de-facto leader who has disappointed global observers in how she apparently gave up her former ideals and seemed no to bother much about it..

Myanmar’s election commission on July 1 announced that the next general election will be held on November 8. In a statement, Hla Thein, chairman of the union election commission, said a “multi-party general election for the parliament” would be held on that day.

Analysts see the polls as an important test of Myanmar’s transition away from direct military rule. It is the first election under a civilian government in six decades.

Aung San Suu Kyi, a Nobel laureate, won power in a landslide in 2015 that ended decades of military rule. But her administration has come under pressure internationally over a military crackdown that drove hundreds of thousands of Rohingya into Bangladesh in 2017.

She personally appeared at an international tribunal in The Hague to defend the army against the allegations of rape, arson and mass killing in the campaign, which rights groups have said was tantamount to genocide.

Suu Kyi remains popular at home

But at home, Aung San Suu Kyi remains overwhelmingly popular, although her government has struggled to match sky-high expectations and has had to rebut criticism over escalating fighting with ethnic armed groups and slower-than-expected economic growth.

The army continues to wield enormous power under the constitution, which guarantees its control over key ministries, and 25 per cent of seats in parliament.

Myanmar currently has 94 registered political parties. They will vie for a total of 1,171 seats that are up for grabs in both houses of the union parliament and in the state and regional legislatures.

President U Win Myint and state counselor Daw Aung San Suu Kyi, both of the ruling National League for Democracy, will also contest the nationwide poll. Over 37 million people in Myanmar will be eligible to vote.

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