Thai PM removed from office

YIngluckThailand’s Constitutional Court on May 7 has ordered Prime Minister Yingluck Shinawatra to step down after finding her guilty in an abuse of power case, pushing the country deeper into political turmoil. Yingluck was charged with abusing her authority by transferring a senior civil servant in 2011 to another position.

The court ruled that the transfer was carried out with a “hidden agenda” that violated the constitution. It also ordered nine ministers to leave their position, including the finance minister, the minister of foreign affairs and Yingluck’s deputies.

The ruling marks the latest twist in Thailand’s long-running political crisis. Yingluck supporters have vowed to hold a major rally Saturday, which many fear could spark violence.

Anti-government groups have been protesting in the capital Bangkok for six months in a bid to topple Yingluck. Those demonstrations disrupted a general election in February that she had been expected to win.

The crisis broadly pits Bangkok’s middle class and royalist establishment against the mainly poor, rural supporters of Yingluck and her brother, ex-premier Thaksin Shinawatra, who was ousted by the military in 2006 and now lives in exile to avoid a jail term handed down in 2008 for abuse of power.

Yingluck’s supporters have accused the court of bias in frequently ruling against the government. In 2008, the court forced two Thaksin-linked prime ministers from office.

Some legal experts have said Yingluck’s entire government will have to go if she is forced to step down, but her party rejects that. She has led a caretaker administration with limited powers since dissolving parliament in December ahead of the election, and her party says another interim prime minister can be chosen.



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Thailand’s Constitutional Court on May 7 has ordered Prime Minister Yingluck Shinawatra to step down after finding her guilty in an abuse of power case, pushing the country deeper into political turmoil. Yingluck was charged with abusing her authority by transferring a senior civil servant in 2011 to another position. The court ruled that the transfer was carried out with a “hidden agenda” that violated the constitution. It also ordered nine ministers to leave their position, including the finance minister, the minister of foreign affairs and Yingluck's deputies. The ruling marks the latest twist in Thailand’s long-running political crisis. Yingluck...

YIngluckThailand’s Constitutional Court on May 7 has ordered Prime Minister Yingluck Shinawatra to step down after finding her guilty in an abuse of power case, pushing the country deeper into political turmoil. Yingluck was charged with abusing her authority by transferring a senior civil servant in 2011 to another position.

The court ruled that the transfer was carried out with a “hidden agenda” that violated the constitution. It also ordered nine ministers to leave their position, including the finance minister, the minister of foreign affairs and Yingluck’s deputies.

The ruling marks the latest twist in Thailand’s long-running political crisis. Yingluck supporters have vowed to hold a major rally Saturday, which many fear could spark violence.

Anti-government groups have been protesting in the capital Bangkok for six months in a bid to topple Yingluck. Those demonstrations disrupted a general election in February that she had been expected to win.

The crisis broadly pits Bangkok’s middle class and royalist establishment against the mainly poor, rural supporters of Yingluck and her brother, ex-premier Thaksin Shinawatra, who was ousted by the military in 2006 and now lives in exile to avoid a jail term handed down in 2008 for abuse of power.

Yingluck’s supporters have accused the court of bias in frequently ruling against the government. In 2008, the court forced two Thaksin-linked prime ministers from office.

Some legal experts have said Yingluck’s entire government will have to go if she is forced to step down, but her party rejects that. She has led a caretaker administration with limited powers since dissolving parliament in December ahead of the election, and her party says another interim prime minister can be chosen.



Support ASEAN news

Investvine has been a consistent voice in ASEAN news for more than a decade. From breaking news to exclusive interviews with key ASEAN leaders, we have brought you factual and engaging reports – the stories that matter, free of charge.

Like many news organisations, we are striving to survive in an age of reduced advertising and biased journalism. Our mission is to rise above today’s challenges and chart tomorrow’s world with clear, dependable reporting.

Support us now with a donation of your choosing. Your contribution will help us shine a light on important ASEAN stories, reach more people and lift the manifold voices of this dynamic, influential region.

$
Personal Info

Donation Total: $10.00