Thailand’s low birth rate worries government, dating campaign launched

The Thai government has become worried about the low fertility rate in the country which has been tumbling since the 1970s from a whopping average of around six children per woman to 1.51 kids in 2020, the second-lowest rate in Southeast Asia behind Laos.

Overall, Thailand’s birth rate last year dropped below 600,000 for the first time. The country’ government has not done anything substantial to reverse the trend, critics say, but without any effective intervention, the rate is forecast to fall further to an average of 1.3 births per woman in less than a decade which would exacerbate already alarming societal problems.

Both the World Health Organisation and the World Bank have said that if a country’s total fertility rate goes below 2.1, its proportion of elderly will surge and problems associated with migrant workers will rise.

However, Thailand has been falling below this level already around 1990. Adding to the alarmingly low birth rate it the rising number of health problems experienced by babies born to older-than-usual mothers, such as Down Syndrome, doctors say.

The Thai health ministry is now resorting to experience with new ways of getting the birth rate up by starting family planning promotions.

Families ready to have a baby will be provided with “all the help they need” in order to ensure the baby’s good health from birth to adulthood, the ministry said.

It also launched campaigns aimed at promoting dating among singles and raising fertility health among married couples who want to have a baby.

Singles’ meeting campaign “to build the nation”

One campaign is called “Marriage for Building The Nation,” the latest in the annual series of initiatives conceived by the government, targeting both Thais and foreigners residing in the country (although webpage information and registrations forms are only in Thai). This campaign includes a singles’ meetup, as well as a giveaway of vouchers for prenatal care. The latter is intended for couples who have been together for more than a year and plan to have their first child.

However, past campaigns didn’t have any positive impact on the birth rate, and there is a likelihood of births in Thailand decreasing even further in 2021, undercutting the health ministry set goal for 700,000 live births this year. 

Experts cited improving education, trends of more people staying single, people marrying later and economic uncertainty over providing for the children as reasons for Thais delaying or forgoing having children.



Support ASEAN news

Investvine has been a consistent voice in ASEAN news for more than a decade. From breaking news to exclusive interviews with key ASEAN leaders, we have brought you factual and engaging reports – the stories that matter, free of charge.

Like many news organisations, we are striving to survive in an age of reduced advertising and biased journalism. Our mission is to rise above today’s challenges and chart tomorrow’s world with clear, dependable reporting.

Support us now with a donation of your choosing. Your contribution will help us shine a light on important ASEAN stories, reach more people and lift the manifold voices of this dynamic, influential region.

$
Personal Info

Donation Total: $10.00

 

 

The Thai government has become worried about the low fertility rate in the country which has been tumbling since the 1970s from a whopping average of around six children per woman to 1.51 kids in 2020, the second-lowest rate in Southeast Asia behind Laos. Overall, Thailand’s birth rate last year dropped below 600,000 for the first time. The country' government has not done anything substantial to reverse the trend, critics say, but without any effective intervention, the rate is forecast to fall further to an average of 1.3 births per woman in less than a decade which would exacerbate already...

The Thai government has become worried about the low fertility rate in the country which has been tumbling since the 1970s from a whopping average of around six children per woman to 1.51 kids in 2020, the second-lowest rate in Southeast Asia behind Laos.

Overall, Thailand’s birth rate last year dropped below 600,000 for the first time. The country’ government has not done anything substantial to reverse the trend, critics say, but without any effective intervention, the rate is forecast to fall further to an average of 1.3 births per woman in less than a decade which would exacerbate already alarming societal problems.

Both the World Health Organisation and the World Bank have said that if a country’s total fertility rate goes below 2.1, its proportion of elderly will surge and problems associated with migrant workers will rise.

However, Thailand has been falling below this level already around 1990. Adding to the alarmingly low birth rate it the rising number of health problems experienced by babies born to older-than-usual mothers, such as Down Syndrome, doctors say.

The Thai health ministry is now resorting to experience with new ways of getting the birth rate up by starting family planning promotions.

Families ready to have a baby will be provided with “all the help they need” in order to ensure the baby’s good health from birth to adulthood, the ministry said.

It also launched campaigns aimed at promoting dating among singles and raising fertility health among married couples who want to have a baby.

Singles’ meeting campaign “to build the nation”

One campaign is called “Marriage for Building The Nation,” the latest in the annual series of initiatives conceived by the government, targeting both Thais and foreigners residing in the country (although webpage information and registrations forms are only in Thai). This campaign includes a singles’ meetup, as well as a giveaway of vouchers for prenatal care. The latter is intended for couples who have been together for more than a year and plan to have their first child.

However, past campaigns didn’t have any positive impact on the birth rate, and there is a likelihood of births in Thailand decreasing even further in 2021, undercutting the health ministry set goal for 700,000 live births this year. 

Experts cited improving education, trends of more people staying single, people marrying later and economic uncertainty over providing for the children as reasons for Thais delaying or forgoing having children.



Support ASEAN news

Investvine has been a consistent voice in ASEAN news for more than a decade. From breaking news to exclusive interviews with key ASEAN leaders, we have brought you factual and engaging reports – the stories that matter, free of charge.

Like many news organisations, we are striving to survive in an age of reduced advertising and biased journalism. Our mission is to rise above today’s challenges and chart tomorrow’s world with clear, dependable reporting.

Support us now with a donation of your choosing. Your contribution will help us shine a light on important ASEAN stories, reach more people and lift the manifold voices of this dynamic, influential region.

$
Personal Info

Donation Total: $10.00

 

 

NO COMMENTS

Leave a Reply